Politics

Reports focusing on the latest political news and trends along California's Central Coast.

Dylan Ring


Students are expressing their feelings regarding last night’s election of Donald Trump as protests are taking place on college campuses throughout California, including Cal Poly.

Santa Barbara County

The top political race on the Central Coast this political season was for control of the 24th Congressional District, currently held by retiring Democrat Lois Capps. 

As results come in across the country, NPR reporters are updating this breaking news blog in real time. 

Bree Zender


Some San Luis Obispo County residents who have recently changed their party affiliation have received two ballots in the mail.

WATCH: Your guide to California's 17 propositions

Nov 7, 2016
Randol White

WHAT: KPCC's Larry Mantle and voting experts host a one-hour special "voter cram session" covering all 17 statewide ballot initiatives.

American root musicians, Suzanne and Jim perform at Historic Arkansas Museum in Little Rock, Arkansas
Thomas Wilmer

  

Join the American roots music duo, Suzanne and Jim at the Historic Arkansas Museum in downtown Little Rock. The musical duo came to the museum to do a presentation about historic presidential campaign songs, from the mid 19th century to President Roosevelt’s campaign slogan and song for the 1932 election, Happy Days are Here Again.    

KCBX News, Randol White

A growing number of Central Coast residents are choosing to vote-by-mail, but not everyone is clear on whether postage is necessary. 

Donald J. Trump Facebook Page

A new study out of UC Santa Barbara suggests a possible reason why many white Americans are throwing their support behind Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump this year. 

Randol White

Voter registration in San Luis Obispo, Monterey and Santa Barbara counties is at an all-time high. 

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Randol White

Central Coast residents who signed up to vote-by-mail will start getting their ballots this week. The packets would have gone out on Monday, but the Postal Service was closed for Columbus Day. 

PBS Newshour YouTube still

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

NPR's politics team — with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more — did live annotating of the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Video is courtesy of PBS Newshour:

Longwood University

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence squared off in the vice-presidential debate Tuesday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, have provided a full transcript of the debate, with fact-checking annotations.

Five years removed from one of the most sweeping criminal justice reforms ever implemented in the state, California’s 58 counties are still coming to grips with the effects of the plan known as Public Safety Realignment.

Realignment aimed to satisfy a U.S. Supreme Court order to reduce the state prison population by some 30,000 inmates by transferring responsibility for non-serious, non-violent and non-sexual felons to counties.

Today, at least 40 California counties have either completed or are planning jail construction projects.

Prop. 61, the drug pricing initiative, explained

Sep 28, 2016

One of the 17 statewide propositions facing California voters on the November ballot is Proposition 61, which is intended to lower prescription drug prices.

Below, Impatient breaks down this initiative, which besides being one of the most complicated ballot measures, has sparked by far this year's most expensive campaign fight over an initiative.

In a nutshell

Under Prop. 61, certain state agencies would pay no more than what the Department of Veterans Affairs pays for prescription drugs.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Brock Turner’s brief jail term for sexual assault sparked outcry across California and the nation earlier this year.

Susanica Tam/KPCC

File photo: Loretta Sanchez greets her supporters from the Ironworkers Union on the night of the California primary election in Anaheim, California, on Tuesday, June 7, 2016. Susanica Tam/KPCC

Orange County Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez failed to show up for more votes than any other U.S. House member running for another office, according to an analysis by Roll Call covering the first three weeks in September.

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For decades, small growers in Humboldt County have made a living cultivating and selling cannabis. But over the last 10 years or so, outsiders have been pouring in to the region trying to cash in on the “green rush” for commercial cannabis.

The medical marijuana industry has certainly sparked a cannabis boon, but if Californians vote for Proposition 64 and allow adults to smoke cannabis purely for recreation, it will be a game changer for the industry.

Death Penalty Propositions Divide Voters

Sep 22, 2016

There are two completely opposite November ballot measures dealing with capital punishment, and a new poll shows neither one is getting support from a majority of voters.

Proposition 62 would repeal the state’s death penalty and replace it with life in prison without the possibility of parole. It falls just short of the simple majority it needs to pass.

Each time New York increased its tobacco tax — now at $4.35 a pack — calls to the state’s Quitline spiked.

In New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg raised the tax even more.

“I was so angry with him, I could hardly afford it,” says Elizabeth Lane, a Harlem resident who paid $12 a pack. “I had to beg, borrow and steal to get money to buy cigarettes.”

California Attorney General Kamala Harris has boosted her lead over Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez among likely voters, 42 percent to 20 percent, according to a Field Poll out this week. But a new survey from the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) shows a Harris lead shrinking to 7 points.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

California billionaire and potential gubernatorial candidate Tom Steyer joined the debate over ending the state’s death penalty last week by repeating a questionable claim.

"Since 1978, California has spent $5 billion to put 13 people to death," Steyer said in a press release announcing his support for Proposition 62.

During her run for U.S. Senate, California Attorney General Kamala Harris has touted a "smart on crime" approach that focuses on the most violent offenders and reducing recidivism.

Harris believes this strategy is key to slowing what she claims is a dramatic rise in the nation’s prison population.

'Yes On 55' School Claim Misses The Mark

Sep 13, 2016

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Recent radio and TV ads claim California’s K-12 public schools face dire cuts if voters fail to approve Proposition 55, a measure on November’s ballot that would extend an income tax hike on wealthy residents.

A majority of Californians believe poverty is a serious problem, but they disagree over what to do about it. That’s according to a survey conducted for our California Counts public radio collaboration.

The CALSPEAKS survey asked hundreds of voters and some nonvoters across California how they feel about a range of economic issues, from home ownership and job security to wage disparity and upward mobility.

Forty years ago, when Jerry Brown was first governor, he signed a law that dramatically changed the way California sentenced criminal offenders. Previously, under the indeterminate sentencing law, many inmates received inconclusive sentences instead of a fixed term. It was up to a parole board to decide when an inmate was ready to re-enter society.

Under the law signed by Brown in 1976, the state shifted to a determinate sentencing structure — and in the years following, lawmakers and voters piled on dozens more laws that added years to prisoners’ terms.

Frank Stoltze/KPCC

A new survey commissioned by a consortium of public radio stations including KPCC has found Californians, like much of the nation, are divided by race when it comes to their views of police profiling and excessive use of force.

When asked about racial profiling in the U.S., 68 percent of Californians said it is a “huge” or “significant” problem in the U.S. Twenty-five percent of state residents polled said it was a minor problem or not one at all.

A statewide California Counts survey found state Attorney General Kamala Harris holds a commanding lead in the race for U.S. Senate over her opponent, Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez.

HIGHLIGHTS | FULL RESULTS

Repeal the death penalty? 6 quotes from 'yes' and 'no' campaigns

Sep 7, 2016

Voters will see two state measures that take very different approaches in changing how California handles capital punishment in November. Proposition 62 would repeal the death penalty, while Proposition 66 would aim to speed up the process. 

On Wednesday evening, we gathered a panel of six guests from all sides of the argument. They fielded questions from the audience on topics that ranged from fiscal to racial implications.

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