Music

Reports focusing on the latest music news and trends along California's Central Coast.

Bertha Hope On Piano Jazz

Aug 14, 2015

Bertha Hope's contributions to mainstream and improvised musical idioms have made her elite among her peers. Wife of the pianist Elmo Hope (1923-1967), Bertha has kept their extraordinary teamwork alive through her highly regarded trio and solo performances.

In this Piano Jazz session from 1991, Bertha Hope performs "In Search Of Hope" and host Marian McPartland joins her for a duet of "I'm Beginning To See The Light."

Originally broadcast in the fall of 1991.

From JakeShimabukuro.com

Jake Shimabukuro has taken his instrument, the ukulele, to a level of virtuosity that is sometimes astounding.

Kenny Burrell On Piano Jazz

Aug 7, 2015

Guitarist Kenny Burrell has been called a "cool, controlled romantic" whose textured playing is "subtle yet sensual, meditative, exultant, wry and intimate." He's one of the most lyrical guitarists on the jazz scene — in fact, he was Duke Ellington's favorite guitar improviser.

The Newport Jazz Festival is under way this weekend in Newport, Rhode Island. Among the featured performers is a young pianist — a very young pianist — named Joey Alexander. He is 12 years old, completely self-taught and one of the youngest musicians ever to play the storied festival.

What do Mozart, Herbie Hancock and Michael Jackson have in common? For one, their musical talent was discovered early — they were all considered child prodigies.

Skitch Henderson On Piano Jazz

Jul 31, 2015

Skitch Henderson (1918–2005) worked as a piano soloist on Frank Sinatra's and Bing Crosby's radio shows. Henderson began a longtime association with NBC in 1951, eventually appearing as pianist, conductor, leader and even comedian on The Tonight Show with host Johnny Carson.

Nick Drake's music is catnip to a certain kind of artist. Melodically pristine and rhythmically complex in quiet ways, the small songbook of the late English singer-songwriter offers interpreters a chance to be enchanting without stretching much. Yet to make Drake's songs new is a challenge. His vocal style of lingering around a beat, while playing guitar parts that were never flashy but always dazzlingly complex, is possible to imitate but difficult to make truly personal.

Corky Hale On Piano Jazz

Jul 24, 2015

Multi-instrumentalist Corky Hale has been blazing trails since her career began. She started piano at age 3, harp at 8, flute at 10 and cello at 12. In the late 1950s, she became Mel Tormé's pianist and teamed up with Billie Holiday in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

For 20 years, the New Orleans band Galactic has made people dance at clubs, festivals, house parties — you name it. "A first-rate funk band" is how The New York Times describes it.

Rio Clemente On Piano Jazz

Jul 17, 2015

Rio Clemente was born Rosario Clemente in Morristown, N.J. Known as the "Bishop of Jazz," he was educated at the Juilliard School of Music. His training in classical music paved the way for his vibrant career in jazz, playing with the likes of Bucky Pizzarelli, Clark Terry, Milt Jackson and Bobby Hackett, with whom he toured.

L.A. native Kamasi Washington has one of the most critically acclaimed albums of the year with his three-volume set The Epic, released on Flying Lotus' Brainfeeder label. At KCRW's studio, Washington recently brought in a stripped-down version of his band, many of whose members he grew up with here in town.

Willie Ruff On Piano Jazz

Jul 10, 2015

Willie Ruff is a master of both the bass and the French horn, which he reveals to be a singularly beautiful jazz instrument. Trained as a classical musician, Ruff studied with Paul Hindemith at the Yale School of Music and signed as first horn with the Tel Aviv Symphony. He went on to team up with pianist Dwike Mitchell, with whom he formed the Mitchell-Ruff Duo and toured worldwide.

You know how some older "legacy" artists program their concerts like a greatest-hits collection? Duke Ellington did some of that as he was getting older — people wanted to hear the Maestro lead "Satin Doll" and "Mood Indigo," after all — but he never stopped writing new music, either. And his late works didn't stop pushing his own boundaries.

In 1969, Nina Simone told Ebony Magazine, "I hope the day comes when I will be able to sing more love songs, when the need is not quite so urgent to sing protest songs. But for now, I don't mind."

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