Homeless

1,125. That’s how many people were homeless in San Luis Obispo County on January 30 of this year, when the county conducted a biannual point-in-time homeless census. 

Broadcast date: 6/1/2017

Just turn on the T.V. and you’ll find tiny homes are everywhere! While tiny homes aren’t for everyone, they have the potential to provide affordable housing solutions for certain segments of the community. Whether it be temporary housing for a homeless individual, a permanent residence for someone looking to simplify their lifestyle, or as an accessory unit to a primary residence, tiny homes can provide an attractive solution. And while these tiny homes have sparked a big trend, many municipalities have been unprepared for them from a code perspective, and so they have brought with them numerous challenges for would-be owners, builders and city officials alike.

Greta Mart

January’s extreme rainfall — though a welcome blessing for many— posed a serious problem for San Luis Obispo county’s homeless community. 

KCBX News, Dylan Ring

The recent closures of several recycling centers in San Luis Obispo County are putting a financial and time strain on members of the area's homeless population who regularly depend on the money earned by cashing in those California Redemption Value (CRV) cans and bottles.

SafeHouse San Francisco offers hope and safe refuge
Arwa Safdari

Jessica Li, Executive Director of SafeHouse in San Francisco talks about the tragic life of homeless prostitutes, often dependent on drug habits, years of abuse, violence, incest, and scorned by family and society.

Li explains how SafeHouse serves as a harbor of refuge. And the women are guided through counseling, nutrition education, money management, computer competency, and vocational guidance classes. 

Teresa Stephens at Cast Iron Grill
Thomas Wilmer

Teresa Stephens, owner of the Lubbock, Texas Cast Iron Grill recounts her fear of the homeless. She confronted her phobia and wound up embracing the homeless and made major sacrifices to feed those in need. Join correspondent Tom Wilmer at the Cast Iron Grill in downtown Lubbock as Teresa shares her poignant tale of personal sacrifice that ultimately enriched and transformed her life through serving the homeless.  

Thomas Wilmer

Phillip Cooley saw opportunity in a 30,000 square-foot abandoned, derelict printing plant in downtown Detroit’s Westside Corktown neighborhood.

Cooley purchased the foreclosed building for $100,000 in 2011 with a vision to provide low-cost commercial incubator workspaces for startups that could not afford market-rate workspaces, along with small businesses struggling to grow on limited budgets.