Community

Reports focusing on the latest community events and happenings along California's Central Coast.

Broadcast date: 11/16/2017

This week we will continue our coverage of a large national poll by NPR which asks people about their personal experiences with discrimination. We will be joining with other NPR member stations for the series called "You, Me and Them: Experiencing Discrimination in America."

Today we will be turning our attention to the experiences and views of Native Americans & Indigenous Peoples. In the new poll, overall, Native Americans report substantial and significant personal experiences of discrimination, across many areas of life.  The report shows that 75% of Native Americans believe there is discrimination against Native people in America today. Kris Kington Barker will join this important conversation with a local perspective. Her guests Violet Cavanaugh, Northern Chumash Tribal Co-Chair. 35th District representative for the Democratic Party and Roberto Monge, Co-founder of City Repair SLO will talk about the experience and views of Native Americans & Indigenous Peoples and examine both the state of discrimination in America and discuss issues and attitudes closer to home.

Dustin Valette chef at Valette Restaurant, Healdsburg. Cailfornia
THOMAS WILMER

The path of destruction of the October 2017 Northern California wildfires that destroyed thousands of homes and more than 25 wineries was indiscriminate. For example, the town of Healdsburg in Sonoma County was spared, but none-the-less there’s not a soul who was not directly affected. 

Broadcast date: 11/9/2017

Have you felt discriminated against in the workplace? In health care? What about interactions with law enforcement?  This week we will continue our coverage of the release of a large national poll by NPR in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health which asks people about their personal experiences with discrimination. We will be joining with other NPR member stations for the series called "You, Me and Them: Experiencing Discrimination in America."

Broadcast date: 11/2/2017

Have you felt discriminated against in the workplace? In health care? What about interactions with law enforcement?  This week we will continue our coverage of a large national poll by NPR in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health which asks people about their personal experiences with discrimination. We will be joining with other NPR member stations for the series called "You, Me and Them: Experiencing Discrimination in America."

Detroit graffiti art at Farmers Market neighborhood
THOMAS WILMER

At the conclusion of WWII Detroit, Michigan claimed than 2.1 million citizens, today there are less than 700,000. Thousands of single-family houses have disappeared from the landscape--some city blocks have less than three houses standing— a sobering, mostly greenscape landscape. Join Kelly Kavanaugh, urban activist and owner of Wheelhouse Detroit Bikeshop as she talks about reinventing Detroit and some of the obstacles created by an infusion of investors from across the country.

Rachel Showalter

Meals That Connect is San Luis Obispo County's senior nutrition program, and serves free lunches to over 500 county residents every day. 

Broadcast date: 10/26/2017

This week we will be joining with other NPR member stations as part of a series called "You, Me and Them: Experiencing Discrimination in America." The program will be rooted in a large national poll by NPR in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. This unique survey of more than 3,400 respondents asked people about their personal experiences with discrimination across a range of areas of life. Central Coast Voices will be joining the conversation with a local perspective, both examining the state of discrimination in America and discussing issues and attitudes closer to home.

The panoramic vistas from atop the Hilton SF Union Square captures the diverse neighborhoods surrounding.
THOMAS WILMER

Frank Manchen, a member of the Board of Directors of the Tenderloin Community Benefit District in San Francisco, talks about the infusion of new businesses, nightclubs, and attractive rents that are attracting millennials with an adventurous spirit. 

More than Sad

Oct 19, 2017

Broadcast date: 10/19/2017 

Suicide is a serious public health problem that causes immeasurable pain, suffering, and loss to individuals, families, and communities nationwide. SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, maintain that nearly 40,000 people in the United States die from suicide annually, or 1 person every 13 minutes. This exceeds the rate of death from homicide and AIDS combined. Currently, more people die by suicide than from automobile accidents. Half of these deaths occur by use of a firearm.

Broadcast date: 10/12/2017

Driven by a grassroots collaboration of friends and business owners, must! charities works with existing non-profit organizations to evoke major change resulting in sustainable programs. Must! is dedicated to improving the quality of life in San Luis Obispo County and in just a few short years has already has invested $1.5 million into our community. The organization’s success stories include CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates), Big Brothers Big Sisters, Boys and Girls Club, and a partnership with the Food Bank Coalition.

Broadcast date: 10/5/2017

Conscious Aging is a unique program for seniors looking for guidance, meaning making, connection, and community to help fortify themselves for their aging years. The focus of the Conscious Aging workshop series is to invite shifts in consciousness away from self-limitation, lack, isolation, and fear and toward expansiveness, inclusiveness, wholeness, connection, and compassion. People assume that the solutions we’re seeking come from outside ourselves, but it’s important to recognize that some of the problems—as well as their solutions—arise from within us. In other words, it’s about consciousness.

Bree Zender


KPRL is a small AM radio station in Paso Robles. They pride themselves in broadcasting news, talk and sports across the northern part of San Luis Obispo County. And for about 50 years, KPRL broadcast football games for the Paso Robles High School Bearcats.

Broadcast date: 9/28/2017

Valley fever is on the rise in the southwestern United States. Also called coccidioidomycosis, it is a potentially fatal lung infection caused by a fungus found in the soil. The CDC finds about 10,000 U.S. cases have been reported each year, mostly from Arizona and California. Many members of the public and even the medical community are not familiar with this serious illness, and the lack of knowledge can delay diagnosis and treatment. Further complicating matters, the disease can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are often similar to those of other illnesses.  That’s why knowing about Valley Fever is one of the most important ways to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment.

Anjalie Tandon/KCBX

This week Central Coast politicians and organizations are responding to President Trump’s plans to phase out the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. 

Broadcast date: 9/21/2017

As a leader in the movement to provide an alternative to the negative influences children face every day. The mission of Paso Robles Youth Arts Foundation(PRYAF) is to enrich the lives of area youth with free classes in the visual and performing arts in a safe, nurturing environment. They provide over 300 students ages 5–18 with over fifty weekly classes and serve over 1,200 students annually. PYAF is making an impact by encouraging students to stay in school, look toward higher education, stay off drugs, out of gangs and out of trouble.

Greta Mart/KCBX

The Monterey County Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution Tuesday to support California’s “Dreamers” and recipients of the federal Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA). 

Broadcast date: 9/14/2017

Many experts believe the increased legalization of marijuana in the U.S. has contributed to the growing belief that marijuana is harmless among youth. With this misperception, youth are using the drug at  increased rates. For example, the 2016 VITAL SIGNS reports shows a major increase in marijuana consumption among San Luis Obispo County teens. It reported forty-one percent of eleventh graders used marijuana in the past 30 days, compared to just 26% in 2013. A 15% increase. Why is this such a concern? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that unlike adults, the teen brain is actively developing and often will not be fully developed until the mid 20s. Marijuana use during this period may harm the developing teen brain. Research shows that marijuana use can have permanent effects on brain function of the developing brain when use begins in adolescence, especially with regular or heavy use.

Broadcast date: 9/7/2017

For more than 40 years, each October the Community of Atascadero Celebrates Colony Days and the reenactment of the original Tent City. What is Colony Days? Why is it celebrated? How did Atascadero begin? Who is E.G. Lewis?

Join host Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with organizers of this unique event, guests Nic Mattson, Colony Days Committee Vice Chair and Greg Ravatt, Colony Days participant and Atascadero Historical Society member as they discuss the history of the Atascadero Colony and the importance of this long standing community event.

Broadcast date: 8/31/17

While Hurricane Harvey has been downgraded to a tropical depression, the catastrophic aftermath continues along the Gulf Coast, as heavy rain continues to move through the region, and warnings of potential flooding remain. Thousands of people have been forced to abandon their homes, leaving everything they own behind. It is anticipated that many more families will be impacted as rain continues to fall and flooding persists. As always, The American Red Cross has been there to help, and continues massive relief efforts, working day and night to get help to where it is needed most. 

Broadcast date: 8/24/2017

Founded nearly 160 years ago, the YMCA is a nonprofit like no other. Today, the Y engages more than 10,000 neighborhoods across the U.S, and 9 million youth and 13 million adults each year. It is the leading nonprofit organization in the country offering programs, services and initiatives focused on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility, according to the unique needs of the communities it engages. On the Central Coast the Y is part of movement that serves well over 10,000 families in San Luis Obispo, Santa Maria Valley and Monterrey County and provides financial assistance to hundreds of families in need of Y programs and membership.

Broadcast date: 8/17/2017

"Inspirational, fun, team building, challenging, rewarding, instructional, teaching tolerance, love of fine music," is how it has been described. The Central Coast Children's Choir provides over 100 children in San Luis Obispo County with the extraordinary opportunity of experiencing the joy of singing in live choral performances while receiving a high-quality music education.

Hundreds attend San Luis Obispo vigil for Charlottesville

Aug 15, 2017
Megan Schellong/KCBX

In response to the August 11 and 12 events in Charlottesville, Virginia, San Luis Obispo locals held a vigil on Wednesday evening. Called Outshine the Darkness, around 1,000 people gathered to express solidarity with those across the nation protesting hate groups and white supremacists. Organizers invited Central Coast residents to "unite our community against hate, racism and bigotry."

Pride comes to Santa Maria

Aug 11, 2017
Courtesy of Audy Macdonald

The Santa Maria LGBTQ community is celebrating its first ever Pride event this weekend. 

Carol Tangeman

While the struggle over health care continues in Washington D.C., a San Luis Obispo County doctor follows his dream by providing top quality care - at no cost to the patient.

F.E.E.D.

Aug 9, 2017

Broadcast date: 8/10/2017

As the USDA reports the average age of farmers and ranchers in the United States continues to rise, many fear that there are few if any young people ready to take their place and provide the food this country will need to sustain itself long-term.

Closer to Home

Aug 2, 2017

Broadcast date: 8/3/17

In 2016 San Luis Obispo County completed a $20 million expansion of its Juvenile Hall, increasing it from 18,000 to 42,000 square feet and from 45 to 65 beds. The project was many years in the making. The expansion project allowed the facility to expand the amount and quality of its services, such as implementing the new custody commitment camp program named, The Coastal Valley Academy (CVA), which is for 14-17 year old male and female youth who are moderate to high risk and in need of residential treatment. 

Bree Zender

Local activists took to the front lawn of the San Luis Obispo Veteran’s Hall Monday afternoon to protest President Trump’s tweet suggesting a ban on transgender people serving in the military. 

AmpSurf

Jul 24, 2017

Broadcast date: 7/27/2017

Nearly two million men and women have served our country in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many have been wounded while serving our country, and are searching for ways to feel whole again. One in five Americans struggle with a life-long disability. Whether someone is a disabled vet, an autistic child, or a young woman who has lost a limb to cancer, AmpSurf offers a unique rehabilitation program that lets all people with disabilities experience the freedom of adaptive sports without limitations.

Hull's Drive-in Theatre Logo
Hull's Drive In

Come along and join Jeremy Reter as he talks about how the Lexington, Virginia townspeople saved their drive-in theater. Reter also talks about the resurgence of Drive in Theaters in Virginia and around the country. Hull’s Drive-In Theatre has been a part of the Rockbridge area community for more than 50 years.

Broadcast date: 7/20/17

It is shaping up to be a long and dangerous fire season ahead, with more heat and overgrown brush on the horizon. Already Cal Fire is reporting that for the period between January 1 of 2017 and July 9 of 2017, it has seen 2,905 fires, burning more than 68,129 acres, that’s 657 more incidents, and 37,555 acres more than the previous year. What can individuals and communities do to prepare and adapt to this increased risk of wildfire?

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