TED Radio Hour

Tuesdays, 1:00PM - 2:00PM

An idea is the one gift that you can hang onto even after you've given it away. Welcome to TED Radio Hour – a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create.

Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life. Host Alison Stewart talks with each speaker to probe how ideas make waves and get inside people's heads to open up a whole new picture.

TED Radio Hour is a co-production of NPR and TED.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, September 11, 2014 10:13pm

    Why do some people spend years trying to answer a single question; or even risk their lives to discover something new? In this hour, TED speakers explore how curiosity leads to unexpected places. Director James Cameron's blockbuster films create unreal worlds. He reveals his childhood fascinations and how they fueled the passion behind his movies. Designer Thomas Thwaites explains what compelled him to build a toaster, literally from the ground up. Geneticist Wendy Chung describes what it’s like to chip away at the mysteries of autism, and the excitement of uncovering tiny but critical clues.  Biologist Nathan Wolfe says the unseeable world of microbes is fertile ground for new discoveries.  Mythbusters co-host Adam Savage talks about three people who inspired him to be curious: his dad, a former Earth Science teacher, and physicist Richard Feynman.

  • Thursday, September 4, 2014 10:34pm

    In this hour, TED speakers explore the complex relationships we have with animals. Writer Jon Mooallem tells the story of the teddy bear and considers how the tales we tell about wild animals have real consequences for a species' chance of survival — and the natural world at large. Animal trainer Ian Dunbar says we need to see the world through the eyes of our dogs if we want them to behave better. Poet Billy Collins imagines the inner life of a former canine companion. Science historian Laurel Braitman explores why some animals get anxious, depressed, and stressed out. Biologist Frans de Waal studies how primates display other human traits, such as empathy, cooperation, and fairness. 

  • Thursday, August 28, 2014 10:13pm

    Learning is an integral part of human nature. But why do we — as adults — assume learning must be taught, tested and reinforced? Why do we put so much effort in making kids think and act like us? In this hour, TED speakers explore the different ways babies and children learn on their own — from the womb, to the playground, to the web. Education researcher Sugata Mitra explains how he brought self-supervised access to the web for children in India’s slums and villages — with results that have made him rethink teaching. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul discusses how fetuses begin taking cues from the outside world while still in the womb. Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik argues that like scientists, babies and young children follow a sophisticated systematic process of exploration when they play. Veteran teacher Rita Pierson says children need relationships and human connection in order to be inspired to learn. Sugata Mitra returns later in the episode to talk about his vision to build a school in a cloud where children drive a new kind of self-organized classroom.

  • Friday, August 22, 2014 4:50am

    We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen. And when they do, how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those darker moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head on. Dr. Brian Goldman tells a profound story about the first big mistake he made in the ER, and questions medicine's culture of denial. Professor Brené Brown explains how important it is to confront shame. Also, jazz composer Stefon Harris argues that a lot of our actions are seen as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately. Plus, Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, tells the story of two unexpected collaborators, and how good disagreement is central to progress.

  • Wednesday, August 20, 2014 7:28am

    This recording of "Beauty and the Brain," a session hosted by Guy Raz at TED 2014, brings popular speakers back to the TED stage with updates on their work and personal lives.  Tierney Thys talks about how being in the natural world engages your brain; Dan Gilbert discusses why we so often make decisions that our future selves regret; Jane McGonigal explores a video game that is better than morphine at relieving pain; seventeen-year-old Taylor Wilson details his progress on the nuclear reactor he built in his garage; and Jill Bolte Taylor, the neuro-scientist who lived through a stroke, explains how her life has changed since her TED Talk went viral.