TED Radio Hour

Tuesdays, 1:00PM - 2:00PM

An idea is the one gift that you can hang onto even after you've given it away. Welcome to TED Radio Hour – a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create.

Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life. Host Alison Stewart talks with each speaker to probe how ideas make waves and get inside people's heads to open up a whole new picture.

TED Radio Hour is a co-production of NPR and TED.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, November 20, 2014 10:33pm

    In this episode, we explore ways to find quiet in our busy lives. How can we make a conscious effort to seek out stillness and calm in a fast-paced and increasingly noisy world? Environmentalist John Francis shares the lessons he learned after not speaking a word for 17 years. Writer Susan Cain talks about the value of introverts, people who draw their energy from quieter, more low-key social interactions. Singer Megan Washington explains how singing quiets the part of her brain that makes her stutter. Cloudspotter Gavin Pretor-Pinney advocates slowing down for a moment to notice the beauty of clouds. Author Pico Iyer suggests it is our reflective moments that give life its meaning.

  • Thursday, November 13, 2014 9:33pm

    Where do stereotypes come from? Is there any truth or value to the assumptions we make about each other? Why do some perceptions persist, and can they be overcome? In this hour, TED speakers examine the roots and consequences of stereotypes. Playwright and performer Sarah Jones explores the fine line between stereotyping and celebrating ethnicity. Iranian-American comedian and actor Maz Jobrani talks about a comic’s role in challenging stereotypes. Artist Hetain Patel describes how first impressions can be deceptive and why we need to think more deeply about identity. Educator and poet Jamila Lyiscott unpacks the three distinct dialects of English she speaks — and what it really means to be called “articulate.” Psychologist Paul Bloom explains why prejudice is natural, rational and even moral — the key is to understand why we depend on it, and recognize when it leads us astray.

     

  • Friday, November 7, 2014 12:15am

    There are problems affecting big parts of our lives that seem intractable. From politics, to healthcare, to law and the justice system — some things just don’t seem to work as they should. In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas on how to solve the seemingly impossible. Attorney Philip K. Howard argues the U.S. has become a legal minefield and we need to simplify our laws. Legal scholar Lawrence Lessig says corruption is at the heart of American politics and issues a bipartisan call for change. Health advocate Rebecca Onie describes how our healthcare system can be restructured to not just treat — but prevent — illness. Lawyer Bryan Stevenson explains how America’s criminal justice system works against the poor and people of color, and how we can address it.

  • Thursday, October 30, 2014 10:03pm

    In this hour, TED speakers question whether we can experience the world more deeply by not only extending our senses — but going beyond them. Color blind artist Neil Harbisson can "hear" colors, even those beyond the range of sight. Physician and engineer Todd Kuiken builds prosthetic arms that connect with the human nervous system — improving motion, control and even feeling. Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can’t speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies who they are. Sound expert Julian Treasure says we are losing our listening in a louder world. He shares ways to re-tune our ears for conscious listening — to other people and the world around us.   

  • Friday, October 24, 2014 2:03pm

    In this hour, TED speakers explore our origins as a species — who we are, where we come from, where we’re headed — and how we’re connected to everything that came before us. Geneticist Spencer Wells describes how he uses DNA samples to trace our individual origins going back 2,000 generations. David Christian explains the history of the universe from the Big Bang, and how humans occupy little more than a millisecond on that cosmic timeline. Paleontologist Jack Horner explains what dinosaurs tell us about our own origins and what we can learn by attempting to revive a piece of the past. Louise Leakey describes her and her family’s long search for early human remains in Africa, and how unlocking that mystery is the key to understanding our survival as a species. Geneticist Spencer Wells returns to tell the story of early humans, and our eventual migration from Africa. Juan Enriquez argues that human evolution is far from over — homo sapiens are becoming a new species right before our eyes.