Morning Edition

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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Popcorn is a truly ancient snack. Archaeologists have uncovered popcorn kernels that are 4,000 years old. They were so well-preserved, they could still pop.

Violence In South Sudan Targets Hospitals

Feb 27, 2014

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A Florida man decided to face his fear of spiders by tattooing a huge black widow on his face. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports that 24-year-old Eric Ortiz chose to ink the arachnid because, quote, everybody fears spiders, and he wanted to see what people think. The lifelike tattoo has gotten reactions from startled jumps to you will never get a job. One person who does not think it's cool - his girlfriend. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene, with an update on hair transplants for your face. Beards and mustaches are becoming a popular trend, especially among hipsters. And if you can't grow one, why not buy one? One doctor says he's performing three-or-so facial hair transplants each week at his offices in Manhattan and Miami. The hair costs 7,000 bucks for a full beard. The procedure, which usually involves relocating hair from the head to face, takes about eight hours, razors not included.

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Olympic snowboarder Sarka Pancochova of the Czech Republic got a flurry of attention when she suffered a nasty crash on the slopes in Sochi that split her helmet. She's OK, the helmet absorbed some of the blow. More than two-thirds of Americans who ski or snowboard now wear helmets.

But as Fred Bever, of member station WBUR reports, there are still the question about how much protection they really provide.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKIING)

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign a security agreement that would keep U.S. troops in his country. Despite the pressure, Obama is giving Afghan officials more time to finish a deal.

Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson describes the response to the Syrian crisis as "strategic despair." He and Michael Abramowitz of the Holocaust museum, tell Renee Montagne about what they saw.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

As Ukraine steadies itself, a first order of business is to fix its economy. Renee Montagne talks to Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the IMF, who is now a professor at MIT.

Workers will lay cable across the Atlantic to guarantee the neutrality of the Internet and shield Brazil from U.S. surveillance.

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas from oil and gas production. The rules require companies to find and repair equipment leaks. The rules also will reduce air pollution that contributes to smog.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We've all been there. Go to the vending machine, insert coins, and watch helplessly as your Twixt bar gets just to the tipping point and then stuck.

TV Replay Confuses Daytona 500 Watchers

Feb 24, 2014

Dale Earnhardt Jr. won Sunday's Daytona 500. But during a rain delay, Fox Sports showed a replay of the 2013 race won by Jimmie Johnson. Thousands of fans took to Twitter to congratulate Johnson.

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The Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film will be handed out in a couple weeks. And though Romania's "Child's Pose" is not one of the finalists, film critic Kenneth Turan says its as good as any of them.

David Greene talks to billionaire financier and liberal activist Tom Steyer about his position on the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

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OK. So in the words of that political scientist in Peter's piece, wealthy donors like Tom Steyer are putting a pistol to someone's head, forcing their pet issues on candidates. Steyer himself sees things very differently. He quit his hedge fund with $1.5 billion and now in his view he's fighting as hard as he can with money and passion to do something very noble - save the planet. When he sat down to speak with us he said his goal is to use his money to limit carbon emissions.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Some of America's richest political activists are pouring money into new SuperPACs as they seek to influence the issues in upcoming Senate and House races. Billionaires including Sheldon Adelson, the Koch Brothers, and Fred Eychaner used SuperPACs to support their favored presidential candidates in 2012.

Analysis: Who Oscar-Winning Actors Thank

Feb 21, 2014

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. We finally have analysis of actors giving thanks at the Oscars. You know, I want to thank my director or some inspiring figure. Twice in recent years, winning actors thanked Oprah; twice, they thanked Sidney Poitier. Three actors name-checked God; four thanked Meryl Streep - and that was the headline: Meryl Streep gets thanked more often than God.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Australian police think they know what happened to a rare pink diamond that's worth $180,000. The diamond was swiped from a jewelry store by a man who fled on a bicycle. Based on fingerprints and surveillance footage, police arrested the guy, who's a British tourist. They're pretty sure he swallowed the loot but they need firm evidence. And X-ray was inconclusive. Think there's a pretty clear solution here - what goes in must come out. How about a little bit of patience?

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Think for a moment about an artist who is really out there in some way. Maybe a musician comes to mind, somebody like Lady Gaga or a painter like Salvador Dali. New research now asks whether you like such artists because of their art or because they conform to a mental stereotype of how artists are supposed to behave. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam joins us regularly on this program. Hi, Shankar.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

Thursday at fundraising dinner, President Obama told Democratic governors that their Republican counterparts are making it harder for people to get health insurance or exercise their right to vote.

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If you're not snacking on pretzels, try some Thin Mints, because it's the middle of Girl Scouts cookie season. And our last word in business today is: cookie outsourcing.

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Last year, Girl Scouts around the country sold 200,000 boxes of cookies and raised nearly $800 million. But maybe we should say not the Girl Scouts sold them all. Sometimes the work is outsourced to their parents. And a recent opinion article in the Washington Post, criticized that practice.

A Wisconsin court has released an enormous number of emails — 27,000 pages — from a former aide to Gov. Scott Walker.

Kelly Rindfleisch was convicted last year of using her government job to do illegal campaign work. At the time, Walker was the Milwaukee County executive.

The emails paint a picture of constant coordination between Walker's county office and his 2010 gubernatorial campaign. They were made public in the middle of Walker's gubernatorial re-election campaign, and at a time when the governor is considered a presidential hopeful for 2016.

Obama Apologizes To Art History Professor

Feb 20, 2014

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When President Obama told a crowd at an auto plant that young people could make a lot more money in skilled manufacturing than with an art history degree, Ann Collins Johns was offended. So this professor of art history at the University of Texas Austin dashed off an email to the president. Yesterday she got a handwritten apology. The president shared with Johns that, quote, art history was one of my favorite subjects in high school. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a reenactment of Russia's hockey coach. After Russia lost in the Olympics, a reporter asked if the coach would lose his job since his predecessor was, quote, "eaten alive." The coach replied...

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Well, then. Eat me alive right now.

INSKEEP: The reporter said a world championship is coming up.

MONTAGNE: There will be a different coach since you will have eaten me alive.

INSKEEP: Finally, the coach confessed. Even after defeat, he said...

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And one of the bookstores on James Patterson's list is Bookshop Santa Cruz.

CASEY COONERTY: We're located in the heart of downtown Santa Cruz.

INSKEEP: That's Casey Coonerty, the owner of the bookstore.

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