Marketplace

Weekdays, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace, hosted by Kai Ryssdal, is the only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast. Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. The 30-minute program has a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, focusing on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. Marketplace is a Peabody Award-winning program produced and distributed by American Public Media, in association with the University of Southern California.

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Podcasts

  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 8:50am
    (Markets Edition) From a markets perspective, we're in a lull right now. No data releases, no big announcements from the Fed. But they will be looking out for soundbites, especially around trade, according to Westwood Holdings Group's Susan Schmidt. We'll hear from her about how all this tariff talk could *eventually* cause concern to creep into the markets. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new technology that'll help preserve avocados, and then we'll chat with the Economist's Natasha Loder about why automation doesn't necessarily spell doom for radiologists. Today’s podcast is sponsored by Carbonite (carbonite.com), Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace), and Michigan Economic Development Corporation (planetm.michiganbusiness.org). (06/20/2018)
  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 8:03am
    Spencer Rascoff has been at Zillow, the company familiar to many a person searching for a home or apartment, pretty much from the beginning. Since 2005, he's weathered the housing crisis and another housing boom. And as CEO, he's leading the real estate/tech/data company into a new market: buying and selling its own homes. He talked with us about where the housing market's been and where it's going.  Subscribe to the Corner Office podcast on Apple Podcasts.
  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 5:40am
    (U.S. Edition) We're looking into who's getting paid to carry out the Trump administration's policy of separating children at the U.S. border. One of the principal firms: Southwest Key. Afterwards, we'll discuss what to expect from today's Senate testimony with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who's likely to get an earful on tariffs, and then we'll talk about a new "life-extending" coating for avocados. Today’s podcast is sponsored by Carbonite (carbonite.com), Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace), and Michigan Economic Development Corporation (planetm.michiganbusiness.org). (06/20/2018)
  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 3:55am
    (Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... Higher tariffs on goods for the U.S. and China might be theoretical at this point, but the escalating threats are already having a real effect on financial markets. So how are emerging-market currencies – already under pressure from local political turmoil – feeling the heat? Then, there's a vote by the International Monetary Fund today on a record-breaking aid package for Argentina. But what is the country doing to help give international investors more confidence in the economy? Afterwards, water has been more expensive than fuel in India for years, but even in the Himalayas, cities are now running out of water. We’ll take you there and explain what’s going on.  Today’s podcast is sponsored by Carbonite (carbonite.com), Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace), and Michigan Economic Development Corporation (planetm.michiganbusiness.org). (06/20/2018)
  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 3:30am
    This week, T-Mobile and Sprint officially asked the Federal Communications Commission for approval to merge. If the merger goes through, there will only be three big wireless providers to choose from. And with net neutrality out the window, people are worried that cell phone service will keep getting more expensive. But there is another collection of wireless providers like FreedomPop, Mint, Boost Mobile, Tello and Metro PCS that offer an alternative, at least on price. These companies are what's called mobile virtual network operators. They've traditionally been known as prepaid providers who rent wireless service from the big telecoms and resell it to consumers. There are more limits on the plans, and you sometimes can't use the latest and greatest phones on all of them, but they're starting to offer more options and ramp up their marketing. Roger Cheng covers wireless carriers for CNET. He spoke with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about how MVNOs work. (06/20/2018)

Even the markets care about sound bites

3 hours ago

(Markets Edition) From a markets perspective, we're in a lull right now. No data releases, no big announcements from the Fed. But they will be looking out for soundbites, especially around trade, according to Westwood Holdings Group's Susan Schmidt. We'll hear from her about how all this tariff talk could *eventually* cause concern to creep into the markets. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new technology that'll help preserve avocados, and then we'll chat with the Economist's Natasha Loder about why automation doesn't necessarily spell doom for radiologists.

Giving a whole new meaning to shelf life, avocados wearing a life-extending plant-based coating debut this week on U.S. grocery shelves. It’s one of the first products to potentially help cut down the billions of dollars in food waste each year in the United States.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

The facilities that are housing children separated from their parents

6 hours ago

Who's getting paid to carry out the Trump administration's policy of separating children?

In March, the Trump administration ordered prosecutors to charge people illegally crossing the border and separate children traveling with their parents. Marketplace's Andy Uhler looked at the money that flows into the facilities housing these children, starting with a firm called Southwest Key. Below is an edited transcript. 

David Brancaccio: Tell me more about this company. How did this nonprofit grow to be such a key player in this industry?

(U.S. Edition) We're looking into who's getting paid to carry out the Trump administration's policy of separating children at the U.S. border. One of the principal firms: Southwest Key. Afterwards, we'll discuss what to expect from today's Senate testimony with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who's likely to get an earful on tariffs, and then we'll talk about a new "life-extending" coating for avocados.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... Higher tariffs on goods for the U.S. and China might be theoretical at this point, but the escalating threats are already having a real effect on financial markets. So how are emerging-market currencies – already under pressure from local political turmoil – feeling the heat? Then, there's a vote by the International Monetary Fund today on a record-breaking aid package for Argentina. But what is the country doing to help give international investors more confidence in the economy?

You have more choices for wireless than you might think

8 hours ago

This week, T-Mobile and Sprint officially asked the Federal Communications Commission for approval to merge. If the merger goes through, there will only be three big wireless providers to choose from. And with net neutrality out the window, people are worried that cell phone service will keep getting more expensive. But there is another collection of wireless providers like FreedomPop, Mint, Boost Mobile, Tello and Metro PCS that offer an alternative, at least on price. These companies are what's called mobile virtual network operators.

69: Why does "zero tolerance" look like this?

19 hours ago

By now, you've probably seen them. Heart-wrenching images of parents and children separated and the southwest border, sent to jail or youth detention centers. The Trump administration's "zero tolerance" for illegal border crossings is just one of several seismic changes to immigration enforcement in recent weeks. Immigrants seeking asylum from gangs or domestic violence will no longer be admitted, reducing legal immigration as well. So how'd we get here? And what does Congress need to do to fix a policy that's drawn bipartisan outrage?

This guy's invention got U.S. Patent No. 10 million

20 hours ago

Today marks a milestone of in the American innovation economy. Back in 1836, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued patent No.1 under the current numbering system. It took 155 years to get up to patent No. 5 million and then just another 27 years to issue 5 million more. Patent number No.

A look at China's unlikely lingerie capital

21 hours ago

On a dusty road in China’s eastern province of Jiangsu, a slim, middle-aged man stood in front of an open truck and played an announcement through a speaker.

“Apples for sale! 1.20 yuan per jin,” the message repeated on a loop.

That's less than 20 cents a pound, which is cheap even for China. Guanyun County, some 300 miles north of Shanghai, used to consistently rank among the poorest areas in this province.

It's summer and that means vacation time. Kids are out of school and all the photos on Instagram seem to feature blue water and white sand. 

So what's the right way to bring it up to your boss? Perhaps your boss isn't that cool about you taking time off. Can you finagle a few more days for travel time, or use your sick days for vacation? And what are the do's and don'ts of vacation time — can you fully ignore your emails? Should you post about it on Facebook?

U.S.-China trade tensions lead to volatile markets

Jun 19, 2018

(Markets Edition) The back and forth between the U.S. and China over trade continues. Trump says he might slap tariffs on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese imports, which has prompted China to issue its own threats. We'll look at how trade tensions are affecting the markets and whether traders are starting to panic.

This morning, a Senate committee checks in to see how the cuts to the so-called 340b program, which allows hospitals to buy drugs at a discount, are impacting hospitals and patients. Critics say there’s little evidence that hospitals used the savings to help patients.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

I visited a detention center called Casa Padre in Brownsville, Texas that used to be a Walmart. It’s run by a nonprofit, Southwest Key, and it’s currently housing about 1,500 children who were detained at the Texas/Mexico border. Some of those children were separated from their parents when border protection officials captured them.

A study of public housing facilities in New York City found that those managed by private developers had higher tenant satisfaction compared to others managed by the public housing authority. But it also found that tenant turnover is higher in the privately managed buildings.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Why trade uncertainty may not be a big factor in Mexico's general election

Jun 19, 2018

Mexico will hold its general election next month. On the line are hundreds of positions in the country's Congress as well as the presidency.

While the Trump administration's tariffs are "not really an electoral deal as such," economic change is on the minds of people, according to former Mexico Secretary of Foreign Affairs Jorge Castañeda. 

China calls Trump's new tariff threats "blackmail"

Jun 19, 2018

(U.S. Edition) If China decides to fight back against the Trump administration's $50 billion tariffs, the president is threatening to up that to another $200 billion in goods. We'll look at the countermeasures China might put in place, and what this conflict means for U.S. businesses that operate there.

Courting foreign investors in the age of Trump

Jun 18, 2018

Thousands of foreign investors are about to descend on a conference center in suburban Maryland for the fifth annual SelectUSA Investment Summit. Beginning Wednesday, they will spend three days being wooed by states and cities looking to get their investment dollars. Foreign investment in the United States hit $3.7 trillion in 2016, the last year for which there is government data.

Comcast, Disney in Fox chase

Jun 18, 2018

A federal court’s historic decision to let AT&T and Time Warner merge has unleashed other deal talks among giant companies. Just a day after the decision, Comcast renewed its bid for 21st Century Fox assets — a $65 billion offer. Compare that to Disney’s bid of $52.4 billion. Fox now has two eager suitors – both legacy media companies vying for another legacy media company’s assets – all against the backdrop of Netflix and the age of streaming.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The United States has imposed tariffs on products from China, Mexico, Canada and the European Union, and retaliatory duties are on the way. What will be the overall economic effect of these trade disputes? One way to gauge that is by looking to the futures market.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Video game addiction is now considered a medical condition

Jun 18, 2018

The World Health Organization has released a new list of medical conditions that for the first time includes gaming disorder. 

The BBC's Anu Anand, host of the Global Edition of our Morning Report program, joined us to discuss how it's defined and what its label as a medical condition could mean for insurance coverage. The following answers have been edited for clarity. 

So what is gaming disorder?

A report out today from CreditCards.com finds that millennials are the worst tippers across all age groups, and that’s costing low-wage service workers a vital part of their income.

Take Jose Mendoza, whose wage is $5 an hour as a server at Pio Pio Latin Cuisine in Orlando. He said he makes about $20 an hour, though, on a good day, because of tips. 

But, he explains, "the younger people, they don’t tip so good."

Video game addiction is real

Jun 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The World Health Organization has released a new list of official medical conditions, which includes "gaming disorder," where people obsessively play video and computer games. We'll take a look at what exactly the disorder entails and why insurance companies might be able to cover it now. Afterwards, we'll discuss the nationwide increase in suicides, and how funding to address the issue is lagging behind.

President Donald Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency created after the financial crisis. The nominee, Kathy Kraninger, is a federal budget official. We take a look at why the White House chose her and how the bureau has changed since its inception.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Maybe the U.S. and global economies keep ticking along until the end of time and the markets remain forever chill. But that's not what history tells us. It's also not the view of the biggest hedge fund in the world: Bridgewater Associates.

In recent weeks, it's been circulating a warning. Bridgewater co-chief investment officer Greg Jensen and two of his colleagues say that, "We are bearish on almost all financial assets while markets are still pricing in Goldilocks conditions" and that "2019 is setting up to be a dangerous period for the economy." 

(U.S. Edition) President Trump has nominated a permanent director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Kathy Kraninger, a federal budget official. We'll take a look at her experience and why the White House says it chose her. Next, we'll discuss how the French government isn't very happy with General Electric's job creation progress in France. Before GE was allowed to buy the energy generation part of the French conglomerate Alsthom, it had a mandate to create a thousand jobs in the country. Then finally, we'll talk to Washington Post columnist Allan Sloan about how U.S.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and it’s the on the rise, but we have no idea why.

“We have the science of suicide that we’ve paid for, which is to say ... not much,” said Dr. April Foreman at the American Association of Suicidology. “The reason we don’t have good answers is that we fund suicide-related research at a fraction of the other kinds of research for other causes of death.”

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Ongoing disagreement in Germany over asylum seekers is threatening Chancellor Angela Merkel’s leadership and could put her political future in jeopardy. How can the country’s government balance its own immigration challenges with broader policies across the European Union?  Then, the agriculture industry is challenged in northern Chile as people there struggle with a persistently dry climate amid years of drought. But innovative farmers have learned to harness the power of fog to help relieve their struggle.

The sequel to the animated superhero film "The Incredibles" opens in movie theaters across the country today. The original film came out in 2004, grossing $633 million worldwide. So with those kind of numbers, why did it take 14 years to make a sequel?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Negotiation in global politics have dominated the headlines recently, between North Korea and U.S. relations, international trade dealings and the G-7 summit.

How to be a composer

Jun 15, 2018

Everyone has a dream job growing up: doctor, vet, ice cream taste tester. But how do you actually get the gig? Marketplace Weekend is looking into how, with the occasional series, How to Be a ...

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