Marketplace

Weekdays, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace, hosted by Kai Ryssdal, is the only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast. Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. The 30-minute program has a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, focusing on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. Marketplace is a Peabody Award-winning program produced and distributed by American Public Media, in association with the University of Southern California.

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Podcasts

  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018 7:54am
    (Markets Edition) Bond yields on the 10-year Treasury note are at their highest level in four years. On today's show, we'll look at whether their rise will continue. Afterwards, we'll talk about Venezuela's decision to pre-sell a cryptocurrency known as the "petro," which is backed by the country's oil reserves. Plus: We dive into the illegal black market for food carts in New York City. The number of legal street food permits issued by the city has barely increased since the '80s. 
  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018 5:18am
    (U.S. Edition) The grocery chain Albertsons is planning to buy part of Rite Aid in a $24 billion deal. On today's show, we'll look at the tough supermarket landscape that big chains have to face these days. Afterwards, we'll discuss Walmart's venture into new apparel brands so that it can compete with Amazon, and then find out what some people in China are planning to splurge on this Chinese New Year.
  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018 4:19am
    (Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The World Bank says pensions will consume Brazil’s entire federal budget by 2030 …but the country today shelved a vote on reform. What does it mean for a nation recovering from financial crisis, and will October elections bring light at the end of the tunnel? Then, a new cryptocurrency launches today, this time backed by Venezuelan oil. We’ll explain who’s investing — and who’s not. Afterward, to Spain where a key business witness will give evidence today in ongoing Spanish corruption investigations.
  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018 3:30am
    In the tech world, we talk a lot about the applications for virtual reality, when you’re immersed in a totally different world.  But there may be more business applications for AUGMENTED  reality, where you add something to the scene around you.  Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks about it with Tim Merel, managing director of the tech consulting firm Digi-Capital.
  • Monday, February 19, 2018 3:45pm
    A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago. And, of course, we talk "Black Panther." The movie was obviously a big success this weekend, but did you know that the soundtrack is too? "Black Panther: The Album" debuted at No.1 on the billboard charts. We do the numbers on how that happened.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro says his government will begin pre-selling a cryptocurrency today, called the "petro." It’s backed by the cash-strapped country’s oil reserves. Maduro is hoping to circumvent U.S.-led sanctions, attract investment and bring the country back from the brink of full-blown default. There’s significant skepticism about this strategy.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

02/20/2018: The black market for food carts

3 hours ago

(Markets Edition) Bond yields on the 10-year Treasury note are at their highest level in four years. On today's show, we'll look at whether their rise will continue. Afterwards, we'll talk about Venezuela's decision to pre-sell a cryptocurrency known as the "petro," which is backed by the country's oil reserves. Plus: We dive into the illegal black market for food carts in New York City. The number of legal street food permits issued by the city has barely increased since the '80s. 

What are apps like Venmo doing with your money?

4 hours ago

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? What do you wonder?

The privately held owner of Safeway, Vons and other grocery brands is plunging deeper into the pharmacy business with a deal to buy Rite Aid, the nation's third-largest drugstore chain.

Albertsons Companies is offering either a share of its stock and $1.83 in cash or slightly more than a share for every 10 shares of Rite Aid. A deal value was not disclosed in a statement released Tuesday by the companies.

Shares of Rite Aid, which have shed more than half their value over the past year, jumped 40 cents, or 18.8 percent, in premarket trading after the deal was announced.

Selling food on the streets of New York City might seem like an easy way to make money, but it’s an almost impossible gig to land — legally. The number of legal street food vending permits issued in the city has barely increased since the 1980s.

02/20/2018: Splurging during Chinese New Year

5 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) The grocery chain Albertsons is planning to buy part of Rite Aid in a $24 billion deal. On today's show, we'll look at the tough supermarket landscape that big chains have to face these days. Afterwards, we'll discuss Walmart's venture into new apparel brands so that it can compete with Amazon, and then find out what some people in China are planning to splurge on this Chinese New Year.

For many, Chinese New Year is a time to splurge

6 hours ago

Chinese people are known as big savers, but the lunar new year, also known as the spring festival, is the one time of year when even farmers must splurge. Think of it as a combination of Thanksgiving and Christmas. The festival began on Friday and ends tomorrow . Last year, Chinese people spent $122 billion during the weeklong holiday, and they’re expected to spend even more this year. What are Chinese people buying? Marketplace caught up with people at Shanghai’s Hongqiao Railway Station before they rushed back to their hometowns.

02/19/18: Life after a mass shooting

19 hours ago

A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Even dogs need to have experience to get a job

Feb 19, 2018

After a year and a half of basic coursework, six months of professional training, and a final exam, Patch — a Labrador-golden retriever mix — was ready to become an assistance dog for Annette Ramirez.

Ramirez, a 53-year-old resident from Manhattan Beach, California, is a quadruple amputee who lost her limbs due to a medical mishap that occurred when she was undergoing a hysterectomy back in 2012.

The economics of presidential libraries

Feb 19, 2018

There’s more to Presidents Day than furniture and mattress sales. It’s a day when we recall the men who’ve held the country’s highest office. Thirteen presidents have libraries to jog the collective memory. We look at the economics of two presidential libraries.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

New tax law includes incentives for poor areas

Feb 19, 2018

A line item in the tax law creates a new Opportunity Zone program, with incentives to draw business to underdeveloped places. This strategy has been tried by former administrations, and state and local governments, with results that have often been disappointing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

Feb 19, 2018

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.

This was supposed to be infrastructure week, remember? It turned out a little bit differently. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin joined us to talk about it. With the recent jobs report stirring fears of inflation, are we worrying too much about rising prices in the economy? Then: We're going to be borrowing a lot of money in this economy over the next eight to 10 years, yet White House advisers, including Council of Economic Advisers chair Kevin Hassett have basically said, "Deficits? Meh." We'll explain the fiscal flip-flop in the Republican Party.

What TV can teach the movie business about diversity

Feb 16, 2018

Tanya Saracho is the creator and showrunner of the Starz original scripted drama “Vida,” which centers around two Mexican-American sisters who return to east Los Angeles after their mother dies. While preparing to put the final touches to an episode with her editor, Saracho reflected on how all this was made possible, thanks to a meeting with Marta Fernandez, the senior vice president of Original Programming at the Starz network. “To have an executive who was Hispanic was amazing, ‘cause you don’t go into these meetings and see, you know, people like you,” she said.

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

Do corporate wellness programs work?

Feb 16, 2018

Robert Granger stands on a thick, blue, padded mat and stares up a rock-climbing wall covered in rainbow-colored, hand-and-foot holds. It looks like like someone threw a handful of skittles at the wall and they stuck.

“It’s a really good place to unwind and think about something else,” he said, during breaks between ascents. “The nice thing is you have to use your mind, as well as body, doing this. It takes your mind off anything else.” 

02/16/2018: Money, ethics and emojis

Feb 16, 2018

This week: A story about the financial holdings of the Trump administration, our national ethics laws and whether these things matter. Plus, what the gender wage gap sounds like, a chat with the designer of Michelle Obama’s portrait dress and a story about how advertisers track every emoji we use. Also, why we should all care about the country’s debt. 

This week, former First Lady Michelle Obama's official portrait was unveiled to much oohing and ahing at the National Portrait Gallery.

"I'm also thinking about all of the young people, particularly girls and girls of color, who in years ahead will come to this place, and they will look up, and they will see an image of someone who looks like them hanging on the wall of this great American institution," Obama said at the presentation.

Should you worry about the national debt?

Feb 16, 2018

Early this week, the Trump administration released a $4.4 trillion federal budget proposal. What's caught several people's eye is that the GOP is usually anti-deficit, but this proposal would add to the deficit and increase the national debt. Mick Mulvaney, Trump's budget director, while defending the proposal in front of Congress, admitted that if he was still a representative from South Carolina, he would have opposed the budget.

A growing chorus of ethics officials, including the acting director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, warns that President Trump's conduct related to his business interests is causing a dangerously negative public perception of the nation's ethics system.

"These are perilous times," said David Apol, acting director of the Office of Government Ethics. His comments came in a rare interview earlier this month that happened to be the same day President Trump nominated someone to replace him.

(Markets Edition) Foreign countries hold about $6 trillion of the $20 trillion worth of Treasury bills, notes and bonds that the U.S. government has issued. China is one of them, but it turns out that U.S. debt is becoming less attractive to China and other countries. We'll talk to Chris Low — chief economist at FTN Financial — about why they're starting to back off. Plus: How one Seattle nieghborhood is fighting airplane noise.

When 19-year-old Italian figure skater, Matteo Rizzo, hit the ice for his free skate, it felt like his routine could have been programmed by a classic rock station.

Rizzo used a medley of "Come Together," "Let It Be," and "Help!" written and performed by the Beatles.

Steve Winogradsky, author of “Music Publishing, The Complete Guide,” said the question for figure skaters at the Olympics who want to use a particular song is pretty simple. 

“Do they need to get permission? And the answer is no,” he explained.

One Seattle neighborhood is fighting airplane noise

Feb 16, 2018

María Batayola says the planes flying over Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood are so loud they wake her up in the middle of the night.

“I remember running to my son and saying, ‘Is there a war?’” she recalls. “’Cause it feels like it’s so low. Not only is it a stressor, it impacts your sleep.”

(U.S. Edition) A group of Chinese-based companies has been trying to buy the Chicago Stock Exchange, but the Securities and Exchange Commission has finally given an answer and it's...no. On today's show, we'll look at why the SEC is putting a halt to the deal, and what the Chicago Stock Exchange's parent company could do next. Afterwards, we'll discuss the state of the housing industry, and then find out how figure skaters at this year's Winter Olympics are getting the chance to skate to pop songs. Who pays for the rights to use them?

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Young buyers have long been considered the “lost generation” when it comes to home buying. But we’ll delve into new figures out this morning that show that while that might be true in Britain, the trend has actually started to reverse in America. Then, the growing economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela has led to tens of thousands of residents to flee to the north of Brazil. We’ll explain why authorities there are now declaring a state of social emergency to cope with the high number of immigrants.

Eurozone growth recovers

Feb 15, 2018

Remember the eurozone debt crisis? At its height — only a few years ago — the bloc of 19 nations using the euro as its single currency — looked as if it might implode. Debt-ridden economies like Greece, Portugal, Ireland and even Spain came close to collapse. Today, everything looks much healthier. The latest figures from the European Commission in Brussels show that the EU (and the eurozone) grew at 2.5 percent last year. That's the fastest rate of growth in a decade. What’s going on?

 Click the audio player above for the full story.

The NRA hasn’t always been the NRA

Feb 15, 2018

The National Rifle Association spent about $5 million lobbying Congress last year. That's up from around $1.5 million 10 years ago, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.  But the NRA is not just a Washington lobbying powerhouse. Its reach extends across the country.  

Click the audio player above for the full story. 

Inflation pressure evident at producer level

Feb 15, 2018

The producer price index for January rose 0.4 percent month-to-month, and 2.7 percent year-to-year. Core producer prices, excluding volatile food and energy prices, were up 2.2 percent year-to-year. Producer prices remained muted after the Great Recession as economic growth was sluggish, but upward price pressure appears to be building at both the wholesale and retail levels now, as the labor market approaches full employment and economic activity ramps up, creating supply and labor bottlenecks.

More U.S. cities are talking about opening supervised places for addicts to inject their drugs, including San Francisco, with a target opening date of this summer.

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