Marketplace

Weekdays, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace, hosted by Kai Ryssdal, is the only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast. Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. The 30-minute program has a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, focusing on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. Marketplace is a Peabody Award-winning program produced and distributed by American Public Media, in association with the University of Southern California.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, February 24, 2017 2:25pm
    The artist Yayoi Kusama is known for her infinity room installations that make you feel like you’re in, well, an infinite room. She’s also known for the blocks-long lines people will wait in to spend a few minutes inside one of them. We explore the financial conundrum of orchestrating a blockbuster show centered on installations that only accommodate a few people at a time. Plus, a look inside the constellation of immigrant visa programs that are on the table for reform, and, of course, a roundtable about what happened this week with Nela Richardson of Redfin and Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post.
  • Friday, February 24, 2017 3:33am
    We'll explore why Chinese President Xi Jinping has plans to move new people into power on his economic team. Afterwards, a look at why stock car racing is struggling and how celebrities choose the political causes they're involved in.
  • Friday, February 24, 2017 3:00am
    There have been a lot of protests going on recently. And at these events, there's a fair amount of time spent sitting, standing, waiting. Ian Bogost, a game critic and professor at Georgia Tech, discusses how a new website called protestgames.org aims to have attendees translate some of that downtime into positive energy. Next, we'll look at Alphabet's decision to sue Uber and Otto for allegedly stealing its intellectual property. And to end today's show, we'll play this week's Silicon Tally with Laura Weidman Powers, the co-founder and CEO of the nonprofit Code 2040.
  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 3:54pm
    We’re less than two months into 2017, and already we’ve seen one of the largest days of protests in U.S. history, multiple cities divesting from a major bank and an endless list of boycotts proposed by President Donald Trump’s supporters and opponents alike. We’re in a constant state of protest, say Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood on this week’s Make Me Smart, one that could very well last the next four to eight years.So what does that mean for the economy? Hint: It goes beyond the widespread scarcity of pink yarn that occurred after the Women’s March, though Molly says that did happen.Some of our listeners wrote in to share their stories of how they’ve observed protests informing their local economy, including Naomi, who works at a party store in Bethesda, Maryland:Normally, January and February are our slowest months, enough that we even shorten our hours during this period. But the week before the women's march was crazy. We sold out of almost all our posterboard (all white and most of the colors) and foam board, sold out of pink and pinkish yarn, and sold out of the large sizes of sharpies. At the hardware store next to us, they were running low on paint stirrers because everyone was taking them to use to hold up the signs. We're still out of Elmer's glue, and apparently, so are a number of stores near us.Over in Utah, some small business owners are bracing for the opposite effects after the largest outdoor recreation trade show in the country announced it will not return to Salt Lake City in 2018 after 20 years there. The Outdoor Retailer show occurs biannually and buoyed local businesses.Following the lead of Patagonia and other vendors, the show is pulling out of Utah in protest of Republican politicians’ fight against Bears Ears National Monument and other federally owned land they want turned over to the state.Here’s a take on the situation from Kyle Vines, whose sustainable rock climbing gear business in Colorado stands to benefit if the trade show moves to the area:[I]n 2018 there is a good possibility that Outdoor Retailer could move to Denver, Colorado. That is where our company is located. Having an event of this scale near our headquarters could be huge for our small business. We have our fingers crossed that the trade show will move here. It is crazy to think that Utah Official's inaction and subsequent los[s] could potentially be our gain in a weird way.So we know some small business owners have a stake in the protest economy, but what about entire cities? An Op-ed by Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s written ahead of the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York City challenged the notion that protesters are a “ragtag bunch” and put it simply: “cash-carrying people are cash-carrying people.”Cohen scolded then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg for not welcoming protesters alongside convention-goers and overlooking the revenue they’d bring to the city by way of hotel rooms, restaurants, transportation and other purchases.If protesters were properly invited and assured of a safe place to protest, who knows how many would come? Two million? Three million? This could translate into a billion dollars or more for the city.Revisiting this article now, it’s hard not to think back to the women’s march on Jan. 21, a permitted event that brought in nearly a half million people — three times that of Inauguration attendees — and surely boosted Washington D.C.’s local economy for the weekend.Get in touch on the "Make Me Smart" website with your own comments and questions for Kai and Molly.
  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 9:43am
    Just because foreign companies can now invest in Mexico’s state-owned energy agency Pemex, it doesn’t necessarily mean they will. Seventy-five years of monopoly bred messy finances, debt, nepotism and corruption. But it’s too big an opportunity for some to pass up, and we’ll likely see U.S. companies involved with Pemex’s modernization. Next, our sustainability desk visits tech startups that are figuring out better places to put carbon dioxide than into the air — and some of their solutions make pretty useful products. Plus, the coal conversation continues with an update from Wyoming.

Weekly Wrap: What's the plan?

Feb 24, 2017

Nela Richardson of Redfin and Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post join Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they talk about President Donald Trump's infrastructure stimulus package, which will be delayed until 2018, and why he could use an economist in his cabinet.

Follow Kai Ryssdal at @kairyssdal

Should you be worried about a data bug named Cloudbleed?

Feb 24, 2017
Bruce Johnson and Marketplace staff

One frame from a video, a few words from a private message — these are the types of fragments that were leaked because of a glitch in the code of Cloudflare, the widespread internet security and website delivery service.

Yayoi Kusama exhibit is an economic puzzle for museum

Feb 24, 2017
Mark Garrison

What may be the most anticipated art exhibition of the year opened Thursday at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Record crowds are expected to see the work of Yayoi Kusama, that rare kind of living artist who draws in collectors, critics and casual fans by the millions. Even a single piece of her work has been enough to inspire fans to line up around the block. And now the Smithsonian has an entire exhibition.

Last year, the Obama administration announced it was going to phase out federal government use of private prisons after reports surfaced of safety and security issues. Yesterday, that plan was overturned by the new attorney general, Jeff Sessions. The news immediately boosted share prices of the two largest companies that run private prisons. With the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigration creating thousands of detainees, all signs suggest it's a growth industry.

Click the audio player above for the full story. 

Uber has had a really bad week

Feb 24, 2017

The news early in the week was that Uber had hired former Attorney General Eric Holder to look into explosive allegations of sexual harassment by a former engineer at the company. On top of that, Uber is now being sued by Alphabet, the parent company of Google as well as the autonomous driving company Waymo. Alphabet is accusing the ride-sharing giant of stealing trade secrets to jump-start its own autonomous vehicle program.

Stocks are a bit down today, following a rise since the election. Christopher Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, discusses whether investors are being more realistic. We'll also look at JC Penney's efforts to fight against the slump department stores are experiencing., and explore Indiana's plan to use drones in search and rescue efforts.

Drones to help with Indiana search and rescue efforts

Feb 23, 2017
Erika Celeste

Drones have been used in war. Amazon has tested them for deliveries. Now one state is going to start using them to assist with search and rescue. The FAA has licensed Indiana’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to use drones as a way to find people who may be lost in the wilderness, and help those who are injured.

Tracy Mumford

This story first appeared on mprnews.org

The Brass Knuckle Tattoo Studio in Minneapolis was wall-to-wall with people Tuesday afternoon, as more than 100 women packed in for appointments.

They were all there to get the same tattoo: "Nevertheless she persisted."

How celebrities choose their causes

Feb 23, 2017
Adrienne Hill

Last year, the Oscars tried a thank you scroll along the bottom of the screen to encourage winners to move away from deadly boring, breathless-stream-of-appreciation speeches.

It didn’t work.

But this year, we might finally get something different.

02/24/2017: Political activism in Hollywood

Feb 23, 2017
Marketplace

We'll explore why Chinese President Xi Jinping has plans to move new people into power on his economic team. Afterwards, a look at why stock car racing is struggling and how celebrities choose the political causes they're involved in.

Top U.S. gunmaker says sales will pick back up under Trump

Feb 23, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

Donald Trump’s presidency might have put a damper on gun manufacturer stocks, but Sturm Ruger CEO Michael Fifer believes that the slump in demand is only temporary. His reasoning? Gun ownership is becoming more socially acceptable.

Blog: Court the protest economy

Feb 23, 2017
Phoebe Unterman

We’re less than two months into 2017, and already we’ve seen one of the largest days of protests in U.S. history, multiple cities divesting from a major bank and an endless list of boycotts proposed by President Donald Trump’s supporters and opponents alike.

Political newcomers eye running for office

Feb 23, 2017
Marielle Segarra

Malka Zeefe is 38, and until recently, she'd never considered running for political office.

But since the election, Zeefe, who's a corporate lawyer and lives in Alexandria, Virginia, has already sought out and been appointed to a city commission for children, youth and families. She's a registered Democrat, and now she's thinking about running for school board. 

"For me, the time of just sitting back is over," she said.

Republicans are inspired too.

McDonald's is slashing drink prices. Starting in April, you can get any size soda for a buck and drinks like smoothies and frappes for $2. It’s the latest in a number of promotions — from all-day breakfast to three sizes of Big Mac — to keep customers coming back in a time of increased competition.

Trump administration hopes to pass tax reform by August

Feb 23, 2017

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the administration is hoping to pass major tax reform legislation before Congress leaves for its August recess. President Donald Trump has set ambitious goals of economic growth of 3 percent or higher, rates not seen in over a decade. Mnuchin said the administration will achieve this through a combination of tax cuts and regulatory reform to spur economic growth.

02/23/17: The possibility of a century-long bond

Feb 23, 2017

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin may be taking on an unusual financial plan: ultra-long bonds. Diane Swonk from DS Economics explains the rationale behind the proposal. Afterwards, we'll look at how educators are trying to fight against the stigma of vocational training and find a new generation of skilled workers. 

Amy Scott

In the computerized machining lab at Berks Career and Technology Center, just outside Reading, Pa., Tim DeAcosta shows off a state-of-the-art computer numerical control, or CNC, machine. He sets a blank metal plate inside, types some codes into a control panel, and closes the double doors to watch as a tool carves a pattern into the plate.

Can Netflix hook viewers on reality TV?

Feb 22, 2017

Netflix will launch its first reality show on Feb. 24. The physical competition show, “Ultimate Beastmaster,” is kind of like a global version of “American Ninja Warrior.” Netflix is making six localized versions of the show: six different languages, six different sets of hosts and the same set of competitors. It’s part of the streaming service’s promised 1,000  hours of original programming this year, shows that will keep its 94 million-member worldwide audience happily subscribing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Can the U.S.-Mexico relationship be saved?

Feb 22, 2017

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly are in Mexico for talks. They will be covering a variety of topics from security to trade, but most of all, they’ll be trying to smooth over what are now very fraught relations between the two countries. There’s a whole lot at stake. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Coal country mourns job losses, town heroes

Feb 22, 2017
Scott Tong

Bringing back coal mining jobs is at the top of President Donald Trump's energy agenda. But it's unclear whether Washington has the power to upend a complex set of trends that have to do with regulations, markets and technology.

In the coal fields of southern Illinois, it's getting harder to find lumps of coal dancing across conveyor belts on the way to market. Last year, some 6,000 miners lost their jobs, bringing the total employment count below 50,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

One of former President Barack Obama’s environmental victories was getting automakers to agree to much higher fuel efficiency standards back in 2011. In his last days in office, his administration worked to finalize those standards through 2025. That came as a bit of a shock to carmakers who had expected a chance to revisit the rules. Now, they’re asking the brand-new Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt for a redo. 

Last of pipeline opponents leave North Dakota protest camp

Feb 22, 2017
Associated Press

The last of the Dakota Access pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, today ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities arrested others who defied the order in a final show of dissent.

What Selena Gomez has to do with the 'La La Land' soundtrack

Feb 22, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

John Janick took over for Jimmy Iovine as CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records in 2014. Iovine hand picked Janick as his successor, and Janick then spent months learning the business from the music legend.

Janick launched himself into the music industry when he started a record company out of his college dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. Its artists included Jimmy Eat World, Fall Out Boy and eventually Panic! at the Disco and Paramore.

Reuters reports that Facebook is in talks to stream Major League Baseball games. That would make the MLB the latest professional sports league to seek a social media audience. But what’s in it for Facebook? Well, potential advertising dollars. Since Facebook can track who’s watching and what they’re doing while they watch, it can offer real-time information that advertisers might be willing to bid on to target an audience at peak game times.

Interscope Geffen A&M CEO says industry has got to figure out streaming

Feb 22, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

When John Janick was an undergrad, he started a record company out of his dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. It went on to represent artists like Jimmy Eat World and Fall Out Boy, then later Panic! at the Disco, fun. and Paramore. Now he runs a considerably bigger company as the CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Janick was hand-picked by Jimmy Iovine to be the music industry legend's successor.

02/22/17: Watching $100 million go down the drain

Feb 22, 2017

We're exploring the financial turmoil that ABB, a Swiss engineering group, is currently facing. The company may lose $100 million because of a criminal scheme at a South Korean subsidiary. Next, we'll talk about a turnaround for U.S. coal mining companies and then take a closer look at one small California community where arsenic is contaminating its groundwater. 

Dangerous passage: Refugees in Minnesota risk death to reach Canada

Feb 22, 2017
Dan Gunderson and Laura Yuen

This story was first published on MPRnews.org 

Bashir Yussuf had survived Somalia's violence, fled to South America, then struggled through dense Panamanian jungle to make it north and seek asylum.

Now he stood freezing in waist-high snow in the desolate Minnesota-Canadian borderlands, wondering if these last few miles of his journey might be the ones that finally killed him.

Mining companies bounce back after years of losses

Feb 21, 2017

Some of the world’s biggest mines are reporting profits again after a rocky few years. Commodity prices are up, and mining companies are leaner. They’ve sold off underperforming mines, and paid off debt. Miners and steel makers are also hoping President Trump will give them a boost with new spending on infrastructure in the U.S. But they’re also hoping he doesn’t start any trade wars, because they rely on global trade. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Why it might be a good thing if your boss is an introvert

Feb 21, 2017
David Brancaccio

Turns out that the most effective leader isn't necessarily the one who's the most outgoing, the most outspoken, the most assertive. 

Adam Grant, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, conducted a study at a national pizza chain with his colleagues to discover the connection between personality type and management style. They found that an introvert's or extrovert's success depended on conditions like how active or passive their employees were. 

Scott Cohn

The crisis in Flint, Michigan, drew national attention to the issue of safe drinking water. The Trump administration has offered few specifics on what it plans to do about it. But Flint is just one example. Other communities are tackling water problems too, like Kettleman City, California, which has been dealing with unsafe drinking water for years.

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