Counterspin

Fridays, 1:00PM - 1:30PM

CounterSpin, a weekly radio show from FAIR (Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting), provides a critical examination of the major stories every week, and exposes what the mainstream media might have missed in their own coverage. Hosted by Janine Jackson, Steve Rendall and Peter Hart, CounterSpin is heard on more than 150 noncommercial stations across the United States and Canada.

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130 W. 25th Street
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 633-6700

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Podcasts

  • Friday, November 21, 2014 6:34am
    This week on CounterSpin: The imminent ruling by a St. Louis County grand jury about whether to indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, has media focused on the possibility of violent demonstrations. But the issues raised by Brown's killing won't disappear no matter what the jury decides. We'll talk with educator and organizer Mariame Kaba about the bigger story. Also this week: The White House's climate emissions deal with China was praised throughout the media as a big step in the right direction. One liberal columnist told readers not to listen to the 'yes but' naysayers. But critics of the deal are worth listening to; we'll speak with one, Daphne Wysham of the Center for Sustainable Economy.
  • Friday, November 14, 2014 6:31am
    This week on CounterSpin: Bipartisanship and free trade are two of corporate media's favorite things, so when the Washington Post editorial expressed the post midterm media consensus--"Now that Republicans have gained control of Congress, no policy area is riper for bipartisan action than trade"--you can believe they were happy to do it. But should we be happy? And is it even true? We'll hear from Lori Wallach of Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch. Also this week: Republicans have been hard at work for the past few years restricting the right to vote. Did their work pay off in the midterms? We'll speak to reporter Ari Berman of The Nation, who recently wrote that "it's become easier to buy an election and harder to vote in one."
  • Friday, November 7, 2014 6:16am
    This week on CounterSpin: The disappearance of 48 student activists in Mexico has brought hundreds of thousands of activists to the streets, demanding accountability from the US-allied president who just months ago was being cheered by Time magazine as the man who would save Mexico. We'll talk to journalist Roberto Lovato about the crisis in Mexico and the reasons the story isn't getting enough coverage in the US press. Also this week: US media presented the election of Ashraf Ghani as Afghanistan's president as good news, largely because he would sign an agreement allowing US forces to remain in the country. Afghan women had different reasons to be tentatively hopeful; but then, who remembers Afghan women? We'll talk with journalist Ann Jones about her new article, The Missing Women of Afghanistan.
  • Friday, October 31, 2014 6:19am
    This week on CounterSpin: Ferguson was back in the headlines recently with leaks from an autopsy report that, we're told, seem to corroborate police officer Darren Wilson's version of events from the day he killed Michael Brown. We'll talk about the impact of those leaks along with other aspects of a story that is far from over, despite the fact that most corporate media appear to have moved on, with Chris King, managing editor of the St. Louis American. Also this week: When the New York Times refers to a politician as 'a former Marxist guerrilla who praises Hugo Chavez' you know they don't mean that in a good way. The Brazilian election saw a leftist incumbent challenged by a business-friendly candidate who we were told would grow the economy. Economist Mark Weisbrot will join us to talk about what the press was getting wrong about Brazil.
  • Friday, October 24, 2014 6:40am
    As the Ebola fear-mongering seems to be letting up a little, one thing that hasn’t changed is media inattention to the xenopobia that has gone hand in hand with the panic, and any real exploration issues of inequality and how they play out in treatment of the deadly disease. We’ll talk to medical ethicist and award winning author Harriet Washington about Ebola. syria-protestAlso this week: Polls show pretty clearly that the public isn't enthusiastic about getting involved in more wars. To many elites, this is dangerous isolationism and a retreat from America's rightful position as a superpower. Carl Conetta of the Project on Defense Alternatives has taken a deep look at public opinion and the problem with elite rhetoric about isolationism. He'll join us to talk about it.