All Things Considered

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In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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There is a subset of puns - businesses that name themselves based on a pun. You know, the kind of thing you see on a storefront sign that makes you groan or maybe laugh, depending on your mood.

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language chanted).

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Foreign language chanted).

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So that's how Ted Cruz is trying to stand out in the crowded GOP field. And now NPR political editor Domenico Montanaro is here to talk about how some of the others are working to differentiate themselves. Hey there, Domenico.

Music Review: 'Bon Voyage,' Jazzy Ash

Aug 25, 2015
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The numbers on Wall Street today spelled panic, but if you could get a glimpse at the financial district in Manhattan today, you wouldn't know there was a historic thousand-point drop of the Dow this morning. NPR's Joel Rose takes us there.

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So that's China's economy and its effect on commodities like Brazilian iron. And, Ari, I understand you actually spoke to a commodities trader here in the U.S.

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The U.S. has around 800 military bases outside of the nation's borders. They're home to hundreds of thousands of troops and family members, and, in many cases, they're a cause of controversy.

David Vine, an associate professor of anthropology at American University, argues that we've become too dependent on such overseas bases — and that many of them cause serious opposition abroad. He lays out his thinking in his new book, Base Nation: How the U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World.

When Fear the Walking Dead premiers Sunday night on AMC, don't expect to see Sheriff Grimes. There's no Daryl, either. In fact, the streets aren't even overrun yet with those dirty, hungry hoards of the undead that viewers know so well.

Still, something weird is happening — and it's happening in LA, not Atlanta, this time around. Fear, a prequel to the hit show The Walking Dead, swaps the post-apocalyptic Deep South for the West Coast, where that apocalypse still has yet to happen (or is just getting underway).

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People in the Spanish city of Bilbao have a mission: to cut down on food waste. Now, to prevent food from going directly into the garbage, residents just send it to the Solidarity Fridge. (This story first aired on August 13 on Morning Edition.)

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