Randol White

News Director

Randol White is an accomplished and well-rounded broadcast journalist with nearly two decades of radio, television, web and print experience. As the first-ever news director at KCBX public radio, he built a newsroom from the ground up, based on NPR-style reporting guidelines and blended with a strong focus on the issues and topics important to our local Central Coast audience. 

I love hearing from listeners, especially regarding the current affairs and news topics they find most significant.  I’m thrilled to have landed at KCBX, where the newsroom will actively seek audience feedback for future story coverage. — Randol White, News Director

During his years as a television news anchor for Santa Maria’s KCOY CBS 12, Randol greatly expanded his knowledge of Central Coast people, places, and politics while reporting on a wide range of stories. In addition, he spent nearly five years hosting news/talk programs on San Luis Obispo’s Krush 92.5 FM and KSCO AM 1080 in Santa Cruz, discussing the area’s agriculture, wine, and tourism scenes.

Randol’s Central Coast roots extend back to the late 1980s when he was a food science and nutrition major at Cal Poly. He later studied broadcast journalism at Humboldt State in Arcata, where he received the school’s “Outstanding Broadcast Journalism Student Award” his senior year.

During the 90s and 2000s, Randol anchored and reported at stations in California, Wisconsin, and Oregon. Working through seven sub-zero winters at NBC 15 in Madison helped him gain appreciation for the mild climate he left behind on the West Coast.

Randol’s broadcast career began on California’s North Coast, working the audio board and providing news updates at Eureka’s KINS 980 AM and Power 96.3 FM. He soon took a job producing television newscasts and hosting public affairs shows at nearby KTVL CBS 10. He landed his first full-time television anchoring job at Medford, Oregon’s KTVL CBS 10 in 1996. 

The San Francisco Bay Area is Randol's childhood home. He has also reported and anchored at several stations in the area, including KGO AM 810, KTVU Fox 2, and NBC Bay Area.

When Randol isn’t working on his next radio news piece, he’s likely riding his bicycle on Central Coast roadways and paths. A proud bike commuter throughout his life, Randol also has a passion for public transit and sits on the City of San Luis Obispo’s Mass Transportation Committee. 

Randol lives with his husband Ricardo and their two dogs Papas and Florecita in San Luis Obispo. You can often see them shopping for veggies at the city’s Saturday morning farmers’ market.

Give Randol a call at: (805) 549-8855 ext. 115


Scientists at UC Santa Barbara are beginning work on a project that could reduce the amount of groundwater and power that is used by farmers in the state, after receiving a grant from the California Energy Commission (CEC) of $2.3 million.

Citrus Research Board

San Luis Obispo County is stepping up efforts to trap and track a pest that threatens the area's multi-million dollar citrus industry. 

Refugio Response Join Information Center

Officials with the Refugio oil spill command center said Friday that work to remove contaminated soil is gaining speed following the arival of a crane earlier in the week. 

Jay Thompson, Cal Poly

Cal Poly President Jeffrey Armstrong spent more than any other CSU president on travel expenses, according to a report by the Los Angeles News Group.

Lisa Osborn, KCBX News

Fishermen in Santa Barbara Harbor are still starting their motors to head out into the channel for the day's catch, despite being among the first to feel the economic punch of the Plains All-American Pipeline rupture back on May 19.

Lisa Osborn, KCBX News

California Attorney General Kamala Harris is investigating whether criminal activity was part of last month's oil spill on the Santa Barbara County coast. 

U.S. Coast Guard District 11

Samples are being taken from tar balls showing up on beaches in Southern California to see if the oil could be coming from the pipeline spill in Santa Barbara County.

The LA County Public Health Department closed beaches Wednesday in the South Bay, including Hermosa and Manhattan Beaches, because of the oil. The beaches could open as soon as Friday.

NOAA says its working to track the Refugio spill's movement with help from scientists at UC Santa Barbara. David Valentine is a Professor of Earth Science at UCSB and says tracking this oil presents a unique challenge.

Santa Barbara County Fire Department

Crews on Tuesday were in the process of digging up the pipeline that failed exactly one week earlier, spilling an estimated 100,000 gallons of crude oil on nearby land and into the Santa Barbara Channel.

Plains All-American Pipeline Company said just about all of the oily soil surrounding the pipeline had been removed from the area as of Tuesday evening.

The affected section of pipe, once removed, will be sent to a third-party inspector to determine what could have caused the rupture.

Flickr member Thor Liland Larsen

Musicians with the San Luis Obispo Symphony plan to meet sometime in the coming days to figure out the best path for moving forward. The meeting follows their recent vote of no confidence in response to the current Board of Directors' decision to sever its contract with Conductor Michael Nowak.

Barbara Spencer is a spokesperson for the musicians and said Monday, the manner in which they were alerted to Nowak's departure continues to be a sore spot. The Board sent out a press release before discussing the situation with the orchestra members.

San Luis Obispo County

There will soon be a new source of water to fight wildfires on the Central Coast. The San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved Tuesday a contract with PG&E to purchase desalinated water produced out at Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant.

Supervisor Adam Hill says the plant only uses about 40 percent of its production capacity, so some of that excess water can now be used in CAL FIRE tanker trucks.

Central Coast residents concerned with protecting the area's coastal live oak trees are joining forces in the coming days to stop the spread of a serious disease. Sudden Oak Death (SOD) has been a problem in California for years, but now scientists have tools to track—and possibly slow—its spread.

Greg Perry, KCBX Net

The Amgen Tour of California riders began Stage 4 at the Pismo Pier Wednesday morning, rode south along Highway 1 into Santa Barbara County and looped back north through Arroyo Grande, the Edna Valley and San Luis Obispo before finishing in Avila Beach.

Stage 5 starts in Santa Barbara on Thursday morning and could very well be a wet ride for the participants with a front scheduled to push through right around race time.

Flickr member Delwin Steven Campbell

New water restrictions are set to go into effect on May 15 in the City of Paso Robles, targeting outdoor water uses including residential landscaping. New restrictions are an extension of ongoing watering restrictions that have been in place in the city.

Surendra Dara - University of California

The ongoing drought is causing headaches for local farmers, but according to numbers released Thursday by Santa Barbara County, it hasn't yet hurt the local agriculture industry enough to reverse overall production values.

2014 was another record year for the county's growers, who grossed nearly $1.49 billion. This number is the total of all ag sales in the county and should not be confused with profits.

Strawberries remain the county's top crop, with wine grapes coming in second. Broccoli placed third.

Brittany Graham

Scientists at Cal Poly will launch a free system Wednesday that could revolutionize the way Californians keep track of politicians in Sacramento. It's called Digital Democracy and it's something lawmakers haven't had to contend with—until now.