David Edelstein

David Edelstein is a film critic for New York magazine and for NPR's Fresh Air, and an occasional commentator on film for CBS Sunday Morning. He has also written film criticism for the Village Voice, The New York Post, and Rolling Stone, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Times' Arts & Leisure section.

A member of the National Society of Film Critics, he is the author of the play Blaming Mom, and the co-author of Shooting to Kill (with producer Christine Vachon).

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Movie Reviews
10:15 am
Fri March 27, 2015

In 'While We're Young,' The Border Between Ridicule And Sympathy Is Thin

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10:36 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Horror Film Fans Beware: 'It Follows' Isn't The Fun Kind Of Scare

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 10:37 am

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10:43 am
Fri March 6, 2015

In The Northern Ireland Period Thriller '71,' No One Dies Well

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10:44 am
Fri February 27, 2015

'Maps To The Stars': Either The Funniest Horror Movie, Or The Most Horrific Comedy

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 12:43 pm

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10:34 am
Fri February 20, 2015

In These Six 'Wild Tales,' Humans Morph Into Destructive Forces Of Nature

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10:52 am
Fri February 13, 2015

If You Strip The Bondage, '50 Shades' Is A Conventional Love Story

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10:18 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Second 'SpongeBob' Movie Is A Nonsensical, Loud, Choppy Triumph

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 10:43 am

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11:29 am
Fri January 30, 2015

When Islamists Impose Their Will In 'Timbuktu,' One Family Resists

Mehdi A.G. Mohamed (left) plays Issan, the orphaned boy who lives with a family outside Timbuktu. The family decides not to leave when radical Islamists come to impose Sharia, or Islamic law.
Courtesy of Cohen Media Group

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 12:09 pm

The word "Timbuktu" is slang in the West for East of Nowhere, but in the film Timbuktu, this city in Mali on the edge of the Sahara is an epicenter, a volatile crossroads for several distinct cultures. There are African women in radiant colors, white-garbed Muslim men in mosques, fishermen who live along the river and nomadic herders who pitch their tents on dunes. And then there are the most recent arrivals: an al-Qaida-affiliated group called Ansar Dine that in 2012 took over Timbuktu and announced the enforcement of Sharia, or Islamic law.

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Movie Reviews
10:55 am
Fri January 16, 2015

'Still Alice' Is A Triumph For Julianne Moore, But The Rest Of Film Is Thin

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 10:59 am

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11:38 am
Fri January 9, 2015

The 'Selma' Criticism For How It Portrays Lyndon B. Johnson: Is It Fair?

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10:10 am
Wed December 24, 2014

In A 'Depressing' Year For Films, Edelstein Finds Some Greats

Ellar Coltrane, who plays Mason in Boyhood, was 6 years old when director Richard Linklater picked him for the role. Made over the course of 12 years, the film is David Edelstein's favorite of the year.
Courtesy of Matt Lankes

Originally published on Wed December 24, 2014 11:06 am

"This is a very, very depressing year for film," critic David Edelstein tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "because none of the great material came from Hollywood studios."

Studios, he says, direct their financial resources into sequels and comic-book movies, which leaves little room for "creative expression, and for doing something weird and potentially boundary-moving."

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Movie Reviews
10:15 am
Fri December 19, 2014

The Strange World — And Life — Of 'Mr. Turner'

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 10:48 am

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10:32 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Depicting An Unstable Era, 'Inherent Vice' Never Jells, But It's Addictive

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10:42 am
Fri December 5, 2014

Prayers And Holy Water Can't Exorcise The Terrifying 'Babadook'

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11:42 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Benedict Cumberbatch Lifts Above Biopic Formula In 'Imitation Game'

Keira Knightley, Matthew Beard, Matthew Goode, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Allen Leech in The Imitation Game.
Jack English The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 4:25 pm

Major studios once churned out scores of great-person biographical pictures. But now you rarely see them except during awards season. They're prime Oscar bait. The new Stephen Hawking biopic, The Theory Of Everything, is a perfect specimen. It's a letdown, finally, but Eddie Redmayne is amazingly tough. He captures the fury inside Hawking's twisted frame.

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