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The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office weighed in on the Senate health care bill on Monday, saying that 22 million people would lose health coverage in the next 10 years under the Senate's plan. Of those, 15 million would lose Medicaid coverage. It's projected to lower the deficit by billions over 10 years, and also cut taxes on corporations and the wealthy.

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Marketplace Weekend Staff

This July 1, Maryland, Oregon, Los Angeles and Washington D.C., are raising the minimum wage.

The nation's capital will still have the highest minimum wage in the U.S. It's going up to $12.50-an-hour. Meanwhile, the debate is raging around $15 minimum wages in cities like Seattle, Washington.

The European Commission has fined Google 2.42 billion euros ($2.72 billion) after finding that the company used its dominant search engine to drive people toward another Google product, its shopping service.

"What Google has done is illegal under EU antitrust rules," said European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager. "It denied other companies the chance to compete on the merits and to innovate. And most importantly, it denied European consumers a genuine choice of services and the full benefits of innovation."

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06/27/17: Too much Google?

Jun 27, 2017

The European Comission imposed $2.72 billion fine on internet giant Google on Tuesday for breaching antitrust rules with its online shopping service, claiming that the company "abused its market dominance as a search engine." Also on today's show: A look at home health monitoring devices that improve care and cut costs for chronically ill patients.

 

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What corporate bankruptcy can teach us about morality

Jun 27, 2017

Does the world of finance and markets needs a good infusion of humanity? One book examines how how a wider reading of the humanities can help you understand finance and at the same time how finance can help you understand the human condition. It’s by economist and Harvard Business School professor Mihir Desai.

How do Uber drivers feel now that Travis Kalanick is gone?

Jun 27, 2017
Bruce Johnson and Kristin Schwab

Uber's company culture could change with the departure of CEO Travis Kalanick. But it's unclear if its rider culture already has. Kalanick's resignation and Uber's continued investment in self-driving cars will bring significant shifts to the industry, impacting how passengers hail a ride.

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Over the past few months, we've been talking about how we find ourselves in such uncertain times. Some think it's because of the divisions among us.

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Medicaid is the government health care program for the poor.

That's the shorthand explanation. But Medicaid is so much more than that — which is why it has become the focal point of the battle in Washington to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

President Trump, who is fond of dining at his Trump International Hotel near the White House, will have some company Wednesday — a roomful of people who paid as much as $35,000 or $100,000 each to be there.

The money will go to two joint fundraising operations — Trump Victory, which will take in large donations and Trump Make America Great Again Committee for smaller-dollar donors.

When Trump Victory started sending out invitations four weeks ago, it announced the price points, but kept the venue secret until a prospect had RSVP'd.

For a first time visitor, Anderson Street in Los Angeles' Boyle Heights neighborhood looks pretty gritty and industrial: old brick workshops, small factories, and a steady rumble of delivery trucks driving by.

But step inside some of the old, soot-stained buildings and you're in a world of high-end art, with paintings worth thousands of dollars on the walls.

EU fines Google a record 2.42 billion euros

Jun 27, 2017
Associated Press

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's competition watchdog slapped a record 2.42 billion euro — $2.72 billion — fine on internet giant Google on Tuesday for breaching antitrust rules with its online shopping service.

European regulators said "Google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving an illegal advantage to another Google product, its comparison shopping service.''

6/27/17: Profile picture thieves

Jun 26, 2017
Marketplace

Profile hackers are stealing the photos and other profile information from a high rate of female Facebook users in India. To combat this issue, Facebook has built a tool that makes it harder to download or screenshot a person's profile picture. We talk to Ankita Rao from Motherboard who has been following this story. Plus: A check-in on rideshare drivers. After a lot of drama at Uber in the past couple of weeks and changes to the company's tipping policy, we ask how drivers are feeling right now. 

The White House announced Monday night that it sees signs that the Syrian government is preparing to launch another chemical weapons attack in its war against insurgents. The White House press office released this statement:

"The United States has identified potential preparations for another chemical weapons attack by the Assad regime that would likely result in the mass murder of civilians, including innocent children. The activities are similar to preparations the regime made before its April 4, 2017 chemical weapons attack.

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The first book of the Harry Potter series went on sale in the U.K. 20 years ago today. It offers a convenient excuse to reacquaint yourself with a world before anyone on this side of the Atlantic had heard of muggles, horcruxes or pensieves, before tourists would crowd into London's Kings Cross railway station simply to peer wistfully at the space between Platforms Nine and Ten.

Here's the first story NPR ever aired about Harry Potter — a wonderful piece by the late Margot Adler, from All Things Considered in 1998.

Some gems, from that bygone era:

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In Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon is a show-stealing character. Tituss Burgess plays the mostly out-of-work actor who's black, gay and an endearing friend to the very naive Kimmy Schmidt.

Advances in technology have made it much easier, faster and less expensive to do whole genome sequencing — to spell out all three billion letters in a person's genetic code. Falling costs have given rise to speculation that it could soon become a routine part of medical care, perhaps as routine as checking your blood pressure.

But will such tests, which can be done for as little as $1,000, prove useful, or needlessly scary?

Transportation Security Administration agents at Logan Airport's Terminal C in Boston snapped to attention Sunday, when they came across a live 20-pound lobster lurking in a cooler among the checked luggage.

"The lobster was screened and allowed to continue on its way," TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy tells NPR in an email.

He tweeted about it Monday saying, "@TSA officers are skilled at screening all sorts of items in checked baggage...including this 20+ pound lobster at @BostonLogan."

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