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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has finally broken his silence. He issued a statement which he posted to his own Facebook page addressing the controversy over how an outside firm harvested the profiles of 50 million Facebook users.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


A big moment is happening next month in North Pole, Alaska - population about 2,200.


There will be one less place to rent a movie.

CHANG: A Blockbuster is closing.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit


In Kansas, you have to show proof of U.S. citizenship to vote. Secretary of State Kris Kobach tried to defend the requirements in court. His trial just ended. From member station KCUR, Celia Llopis-Jepsen reports.

More Details Emerge About Austin Bomber

18 hours ago

Copyright 2018 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

Updated at 10:20 p.m. ET

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared open to limited government regulation of some activities of his company, as he fielded questions about reports that Cambridge Analytica exploited Facebook users personal data to influence the U.S. elections.

"I'm not sure we shouldn't be regulated," he said on CNN during a rare interview. "I actually think the question is more, what is the right regulation, rather than yes or no, should it be regulated?"

03/21/2018: America, meet your new Fed Chair

19 hours ago

The new guy on the monetary policy block had his first press conference today. His first rate hike, too. Jay Powell's been in the big chair at the Federal Reserve six or seven weeks by now. Job No. 1 today was to not upset the economic apple cart. He didn't, and the economic news helped. That's where we'll start today. Then: Facebook. First we'll get an update from Marketplace Tech's Molly Wood about the latest turn in the site's data privacy controversy, and then we'll look at what the rest of us can do about it. Delete our accounts? Not so fast.

Fed raises key rate and foresees 2 more hikes this year

19 hours ago

The Federal Reserve is raising its benchmark interest rate to reflect a solid U.S. economy and signaling that it’s sticking with a gradual approach to rate hikes for 2018 under its new chairman, Jerome Powell.

The Fed said it expects to increase rates twice more this year. At the same time, it increased its estimate for rate hikes in 2019 from two to three, reflecting an expectation of faster growth and lower unemployment.

On Wednesday, Mississippi became the 49th state to choose its first woman to send to Congress.

The appointment of Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith as Mississippi's junior senator comes 101 years after the first woman, Montana Rep. Jeannette Rankin, went to Congress. Republican Gov. Phil Bryant appointed Hyde-Smith to fill the seat being vacated by Sen. Thad Cochran, who announced that he would resign as of April 1 due to poor health.

Authorities say Mark Anthony Conditt, the man suspected in the recent series of deadly Austin-area bombings, died in a blast that he intentionally triggered as police closed in on him Wednesday.

Questions now turn to Conditt's background and what drove his killing spree.

A friend of the suspect, Jeremiah Jensen, describes Conditt as shy, smart and thoughtful. Jensen attended church with Conditt and says he was "pretty good friends" with him in 2012 and 2013. Jensen says Conditt never exhibited tendencies that made him think he'd be "capable of something like this."

A federal regulator has cited a Baltimore hospital for breaches of federal regulatory requirements, after a passerby shot a video of a confused patient in a hospital gown being taken by guards to a bus stop on a cold night in January.

The disturbing video prompted broader questions about the University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus's treatment of emergency room patients.

In the sunny colonial city of Oaxaca, Mexico, diners at the upscale restaurant Los Danzantes might notice their fellow patrons drinking a brown, carbonated soda. It looks like Coca-Cola and it tastes — almost — like Coca-Cola. But Coca-Cola it is not.

It's a drink called Zega-Cola, an all-natural substitute to the ubiquitous soft drink. It's made in the nearby village Santa Ana Zegache, and these days, many Oaxacans are clamoring for it. Its creator, a carpenter named Antonio Ambrosio Salvador, sold more Zega-Cola last month than in his entire first year of production.

Comic Roy Wood Jr. is now a correspondent for The Daily Show, but he got his start performing in comedy clubs in the South and Midwest — sometimes in places where he felt unsafe as a black man.

"I did a lot of shows in a lot of strange places," he says. "I've been called the n-word from the stage by somebody in the crowd and the club owner did nothing to defend me."

Scientific advancement: It's all in the wiggle.

Updated at 9:20 pm ET

House and Senate leaders posted a 2,232 page spending bill to fund the government through September 30 of this year on Wednesday evening ahead of a midnight Friday deadline.

Scratch another Guinea worm hot spot off the list.

One of the countries hardest hit with the parasite — South Sudan — has finally stopped transmission, the Carter Center announced Wednesday.

The country reported zero cases in 2017 and hasn't had a case in 15 months. There are also no signs Guinea worm is circulating in dogs in South Sudan, as it is in Chad and Mali.

03/21/2018: Going green can be expensive

21 hours ago

(Markets Edition) President Trump wants to use a multi-million media campaign to help combat the opioid epidemic. But do public health campaigns actually work? We'll look at some previous advertising efforts to steer people away from drugs. Afterwards, we'll discuss how Pittsburgh's plan to green up the city may leave low-income residents behind.

The British data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica has gone from mysterious genius to potential defendant as details emerge about its role in Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign. With conservative strategist Steve Bannon playing a founding role, backed by money from billionaire Robert Mercer and his daughter Rebekah, the firm was able to develop data from 50 million Facebook users into a psychologically-based strategy to target voters.

When Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret Heckler announced that scientists had discovered the virus that caused AIDS at a press conference in 1984, the disease was still mysterious and invariably fatal.

Standing in Times Square in front of street performers dressed up as the Statue of Liberty, the two teenage girls look like typical tourists. They're grinning and posing on their first visit to New York City.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach got a tongue lashing Tuesday from the judge who will decide whether he violated federal law by blocking tens of thousands of voter applications.

Federal Chief District Judge Julie Robinson, a George W. Bush appointee, accused Kobach of engaging in "gamesmanship" and skirting her orders.

In the nearly two years since Robinson ordered him to register those voters, she said, he has forced her and the American Civil Liberties Union to monitor his actions down to the tiniest details in an effort to get him to comply.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

No matter the adage or that the calendar tells us spring has sprung, March is still roaring like a lion on both sides of the country. On Wednesday, the West Coast braced for potential mudslides and flooding following heavy rain, and much of the East Coast dealt with a major snowstorm.

If you've ever gone down the rabbit hole that is OK Go's YouTube channel, then you know how insanely cool the band's music videos are.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

The suspected serial bomber who died north of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday morning was Mark Anthony Conditt, a 23-year-old who grew up in the area, public records show. Conditt died from an explosion that police say he triggered when a SWAT team was closing in on him.

March 21 Is The Busiest Day On The U.N. Calendar

Mar 21, 2018

Editor's Note: This story was originally published on March 21, 2016 and has been updated.

March 21 is making headlines for its fierce spring snowstorm. But that's not the only distinction on this day. It's also the busiest spot on the United Nations' calendar of international observances, with five different U.N.-declared "Days." Here's a rundown:

Derek Klingenberg is kind of a farmer celebrity.

His YouTube channel draws more than 70,000 subscribers for ag-themed pop-music parodies, trombone covers and, more recently, cow art made with satellites.