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Analysis
2:54 am
Tue March 3, 2015

What's At Stake In The Iraqi Battle For Tikrit?

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Iraq
2:38 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Advised By Iran's Military, Iraqi Forces Launch Effort To Retake Tikrit

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Politics
2:12 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Controverisal Netanyahu Speech Is Latest Glitch In U.S.-Israel Relations

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Politics
2:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, In Public Office Since 1976, Won't Seek Re-Election

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NPR Story
2:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Netanyahu Speech: The View From Israel

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:28 am

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Shots - Health News
1:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

What Shapes Health? Join The Discussion On Harvard's Webcast

Mitchell Funk/Getty Images

Health is more than the sum of its parts. Sometimes in surprising ways, factors such as childhood experiences, housing conditions, poor diets and health care access drive who ends up sick — and who does not.

As part of the series "What Shapes Health," created in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard is sponsoring a webcast on Tuesday, March 3 from 12:30 to 1:30 pm EST.

To pose questions, email theforum@hsph.harvard.edu.

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Religion
12:47 am
Tue March 3, 2015

In English Town, Muslims Lead Effort To Create Interfaith Haven

A Lego model of All Souls Church rests on the altar, which was retained when the Bolton, England, church was renovated into an interfaith community center. The model was built by children taking part in an after-school program there.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:03 am

Inayat Omarji vividly remembers the worried reaction when he first looked into renovating the abandoned church in his neighborhood: "There's a bearded young Muslim chap involved in a church! Whoops! He's gonna turn it into a mosque!"

At the time, Omarji was head of the local council of mosques, but there already were three or four in his neighborhood in Bolton, England.

"What it needed is a place where people could meet, people can come to, people can socialize," he says.

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U.S.
12:41 am
Tue March 3, 2015

States Face Correctional Officer Shortage Amid A Cultural Stigma

Corrections officer Sgt. Charles Galaviz secures an inmate for transfer with handcuffs and shackles Jan. 24 at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, in Lexington, Okla. Overtime is mandatory for correctional officers in the state's prisons, which have a manpower shortage of about 33 percent and the highest inmate homicide rate in the country.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:03 am

More than 1.3 million people are incarcerated in state prisons in this country, and keeping those prisons running requires tens of thousands of corrections officers. But right now, some states are facing major staffing shortages.

Much of this shortfall is because of the strong economy, but recruiters also are struggling with the job's cultural stigma.

Cadets at Wyoming's Department of Corrections Training Academy are practicing how they'll handcuff prisoners; in a few weeks this scenario will be very real, but right now everyone is pretty relaxed.

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Economy
12:39 am
Tue March 3, 2015

In Houston, Falling Oil Prices Spark Fears Of Job Cuts Beyond Energy

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:03 am

In recent weeks, the price of gasoline has ticked up but regular unleaded still costs about a dollar less than it did a year ago. That's good for consumers, who have more money to spend. But in Houston, one way or another, the paychecks consumers depend on come from the oil business.

The world's three biggest oilfield service firms — Schlumberger, Halliburton and Baker Hughes — have announced a combined 22,000 layoffs in recent months. Those job cuts are worldwide, but many are falling in Houston, where all three companies have headquarters.

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Shots - Health News
12:37 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Improving Housing Can Pay Dividends In Better Health

Uzuri Pease-Greene, right, leads a walk through the public housing complex in the Potrero Hill neighborhood of San Francisco where her family lives. She is working to have the old buildings replaced.
Talia Herman for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:08 am

Faiza Ayesh giggles with delight as she describes her brand-new two-bedroom apartment in Oakland, Calif. She shares her home with her husband and three little girls, ages 3, 2 and 5 months. Ayesh, 30, says she just loves being a stay-at-home mom. "It's the best job in the world."

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Shots - Health News
12:37 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Abortion Restrictions Complicate Access For Ohio Women

Abortion rights opponent Brian Normile of Beavercreek, Ohio, holds up a poster during a prayer vigil outside Planned Parenthood in Washington, D.C., in January.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:03 am

Ohio may not have gotten the national attention of say, Texas, but a steady stream of abortion restrictions over the past four years has helped close nearly half the state's clinics that perform the procedure.

"We are more fully booked, and I think we have a harder time squeezing patients in if they're earlier in the pregnancy," says Chrisse France, executive director of Preterm. It's one of just two clinics still operating in Cleveland, and its caseload is up 10 percent.

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NPR Ed
12:34 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Behold The Humble Block! Tools of the Trade

Bing Nursery School Courtesy of Bing school

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:18 am

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, Presidential Fitness Test and Bunsen burner.

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Politics
3:51 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, 'Ground-Breaker' For Women Legislators, Won't Seek Re-Election

Mikulski, left, and her then-opponent Linda Chavez hold hands before the Maryland Senate candidates debate in 1986.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 10:18 pm

A surprise political announcement Monday — the longest-serving woman in Congress, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, said she will not seek re-election next year. Mikulski was first elected to the House in 1976, and 10 years later, was elected to the Senate.

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Code Switch
3:16 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Before Rosa Parks, A Teenager Defied Segregation On An Alabama Bus

"I knew why they chose Rosa" Parks instead of her as a symbol of the civil rights movement, Colvin says. "They thought I would be too militant for them."
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 4:45 pm

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955. But Parks' civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student from a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

With Much Controversy, Boston Begins Removing Parking Space Savers

A fashion doll in a milk crate saves a parking space on a residential street in South Boston.
Elise Amendola AP

The near-record amount of snow that has fallen on Boston this winter is testing one of the city's great traditions: On orders from Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Public Works Department began removing parking space savers from city streets on Monday.

In the past, the informal rule has been that whoever takes the time to dig out a parking space gets to keep it for 48 hours. But this year, the city has gotten about 100 inches of snow and those 48 hours have turned into weeks.

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